2006 Mazda 3 power steering

Tiny
ILLS
  • MEMBER
  • 2006 MAZDA 3
  • 2.3L
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • MANUAL
  • 150,000 MILES
Have an 06 mazda3 and last night my power steering malfunction light came on and the it became difficult to steer. I shut the car off and back on and it was back to normal for a few minutes then it restarted. It was raining very hard and the splash guard underneath the engine is off
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Saturday, January 11th, 2014 AT 5:55 PM

5 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Logic would dictate water flooded the power steering belt and it was slipping. If that's all that happened, the power assist will return to normal once the belt dries off.
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Saturday, January 11th, 2014 AT 6:53 PM
Tiny
ILLS
  • MEMBER
This car doesnt have a power steering belt its hydro-electric
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Saturday, January 11th, 2014 AT 8:11 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
How did you determine that? The Mazda 3 has a standard power steering pump and belt, and a standard rack and pinion assembly. I don't see any references to a variable-assist valve. That doesn't mean your car doesn't have one but that is vastly different than the electrically-driven power steering pumps used on electric cars.
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Saturday, January 11th, 2014 AT 8:48 PM
Tiny
ILLS
  • MEMBER
Mazda 3s use an electric-hydro power steering system, it's basically a hybrid so it doesn't have the belt to power it
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Saturday, January 11th, 2014 AT 9:06 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Very sorry but I can't find any reference to that steering system other than that it exists. Everything I've seen uses a belt-driven pump, and that's all I can find parts listings for except right on the Mazda web site. The best I can suggest is since lots of water was involved, check the electrical connectors for signs of corrosion. That can become conductive when it gets wet. That most often affects low-current signal circuits, not the high-current pump circuit.

Don't overlook moisture getting into the fuse box. Safety systems like air bags, anti-lock brakes, and electronic steering systems all require computer modules, and all will have a minimum of two fused power supply circuits. One is needed to run the warning lights when there's a problem with the other one. Corrosion on a fuse's terminals can stop a circuit from working while the other circuit will run the warning light.
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Saturday, January 11th, 2014 AT 10:23 PM

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