Chirping noise

Tiny
YROBERTS
  • MEMBER
  • 2005 NISSAN ALTIMA
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 97,000 MILES
My car chirps when the A/C is on and idling. It stops when I turn the steering wheel. It has around 97000 miles and no work has been done on it recently. From what I've read here, I believe I need a belt and tensioner. Is this correct and what are the exact parts I will need?
Thank you!
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Friday, December 3rd, 2010 AT 6:58 PM

3 Replies

Tiny
OBXAUTOMEDIC
  • EXPERT
Hello,

Ok, there are 3 possibilities.

1 - Idler or Tensioner Pulley Bearing going bad

2 - Weak tensioner

3 - A/C Clutch Bearing going bad

To check for bad Idler or Tensioner Pulley bearing going bad, with can of spray lube in hand find the 2 pulleys(DO NOT START VEHICLE YET) spray 1 of the pulleys at the center bolt. Start engine, if noise is gone for a couple minutes then returns replace pulley, If noise still present turn off vehicle and spray the other pulley and start engine, again if noise is gone for couple minutes and returns replace pulley.

If noise is still present turn off engine, spray around the A/C Clutch and pulley area as best you can, start engine, if noise is gone for couple mminutes then you will have to change the clutch assembly if available if not then will need to replace A/C Compressor.

Tensioner - while engine is running watch the tensioner does it appear to move excessively? If so replace tensioner assembly.

.
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Friday, December 3rd, 2010 AT 7:10 PM
Tiny
EBARRIOS1127
  • MEMBER
Obxautomedic, can the described above cause the engine to stall if it is the clutch assembly? I may have a combination of the above plus I have replaced the crank possitioning sensor and the speed sensor twice already.
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Wednesday, August 3rd, 2011 AT 12:16 AM
Tiny
RIVERMIKERAT
  • MEMBER
IF the AC compressor is frozen solid, it MIGHT be able to make the engine stall while idling. But it's highly doubtful.

Push on the belt in the middle of the belt between the 2 pulleys that are farthest apart. You should not be able to cause the belt to deflect more than about an inch with moderate force. You can also try the twist test: Twist the belt in the same place. You shouldn't be able to twist the belt beyond half a turn. While twisting, check the contact surface of the belt, looking for cracks. Cracks are bad.
The tensioner shouldn't be able to be moved (to loosen the belt) by hand.

All you should need to change the belt and tensioner is a couple wrenches, a ratchet, and some sockets, plus the new belt and tensioner.
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Saturday, October 8th, 2011 AT 11:41 PM

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