2005 Chrysler 300C 5.7Liter Code/Engine Trouble

Tiny
360DARYL
  • MEMBER
  • 2005 CHRYSLER 300
  • 5.7L
  • V8
  • RWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 127,381 MILES
Hi I have a 2005 Chrysler 300C 5.7L problem with it have a code P0522 that will not go away, have changed the oil pressure sensor, crank sensor and the cam sensor and, and vehicle takes about 4-6 seconds to crank over before it starts.
Codes that come up are.
P0522
P0340
P0325
P0330
After I reset the codes they go away, except P0522 stays on and the engine light stays lit
And tried the battery disconnected over night to rest code but engine light still stays lit when hooking back up the battery.
So at that puzzled why this code/codes come back?
Changed spark plugs, crank sensor, cam sensor, oil changed + oil filer 5W20
So at that just wondering what needs to be done and fixed.
Do you
have the same problem?
Yes
No
Friday, December 4th, 2015 AT 5:59 PM

8 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
P0522 - Engine Oil Pressure Sensor/Switch Circuit Low Voltage

The first thing to understand is diagnostic fault codes never say to replace parts or that one is bad. When a part is referenced in a fault code, it is actually the cause of that code about half of the time. You have to rule out wiring and connector problems first. An easy way to do that is to view the status of the circuit on a scanner. Unless something has changed recently, that type of sensor is fed with 5.0 volts on the signal wire, then the sensor draws it down to between 0.5 and 4.5 volts. A grounded signal wire will have 0.0 volts on it, and an open circuit, such as the sensor is unplugged, will result in the full 5.0 volts on it. Both are unacceptable conditions that will set a fault code. The scanner should display the sensor voltage on the "live data" screen.

If you find the signal voltage is within that acceptable range, the code is likely being set due to an intermittent condition. You have to wiggle connectors and wire harnesses while watching the voltage on the scanner to see what makes it change.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Friday, December 4th, 2015 AT 7:08 PM
Tiny
360DARYL
  • MEMBER
Could it be a possibility of the battery being to old or the alternator giving low voltage to the electrical system?
For the reason I ask is everything on this vehicle I own it has all manufacturer parts since day one, and have not change anything on it until now, like I said I've only change these sensors that I have mentioned.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Friday, December 4th, 2015 AT 7:37 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Low system voltage or excessive "ripple" voltage due to one failed diode of the six in the alternator used to be good suspects because unstable voltage confuses computers and makes them do weird things. Your system has a circuit for the Engine Computer to monitor the alternator's output more closely than just system voltage, so it's unlikely the charging system is causing this problem. Nevertheless, to start the testing, measure the battery voltage with the engine running. It must be between 13.75 and 14.75 volts. If that is okay, you need a professional load tester to do the next part of the test. That involves testing for maximum output current, and the ripple voltage I mentioned. If one of the diodes has failed, the most you'll be able to get is exactly one third of the alternator's rated maximum current, and ripple voltage will be high.

The typical symptom for a failed diode is multiple computers get confused so multiple dash warning lights will be on, and if you use a lot of power accessories like the heater fan on high, and the head lights and wipers are on, you may not be able to get enough current from the alternator. The battery will have to make up the difference until it slowly runs down over days or weeks. You're also likely to see the head lights dim when the engine is at idle speed.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
-2
Friday, December 4th, 2015 AT 8:00 PM
Tiny
360DARYL
  • MEMBER
Okay I'll take it in for a proper diagnostics with the Dealer, but as for thee vehicle taking long to crank over, anywhere from 5-6 seconds before it starts up, what might be the possible causes for this just so I can take in all the knowledge I can.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Saturday, December 5th, 2015 AT 4:42 PM
Tiny
360DARYL
  • MEMBER
Also I heard that the Crankshaft sensor and the Camshaft sensor are out of sync that's what causes the vehicle to take long to crank and start up?
If this is true is there anyway on how to sync them together?
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Saturday, December 5th, 2015 AT 5:07 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
P0325 - Knock Sensor 1 Circuit Malfunction (Bank 1 or Single Sensor)
P0330 - Knock Sensor 2 Circuit Malfunction (Bank 2)
P0340 - Camshaft Position Sensor Circuit Malfunction

The most common cause of long crank time is fuel pressure dropped while the engine was off. It should maintain pressure for days or weeks. A leaky fuel injector is the best suspect. To verify this, you can attach a fuel pressure gauge and watch what happens to the pressure when the car is sitting. Another potential clue can be found by turning the ignition switch to "run", wait a few seconds, turn it off, to "run" again, then crank the engine. Each time you turn the switch on the fuel pump will run for one second. Two seconds total is usually enough to build the pressure high enough for the engine to start. If dropping pressure is the cause, this procedure should help it start faster.

Given the code 340, it's more likely there's an intermittent problem with that sensor or its wiring and connectors. Start by checking for corrosion on the connector terminals.

I left the dealership in '99 so I'm not real familiar with your model, but in the '90s, a failure of either the camshaft position sensor or the crankshaft position sensor resulted in a no-start condition. There would be no spark and the fuel pump would not run during cranking, only for that initial one second, but that was enough to erroneously make it appear the pump was working.

If the timing belt jumped one tooth, a diagnostic fault code would be set related to "cam and crank sync", but the engine would still run. If it jumped two teeth, the Engine Computer would shut the engine down to protect the valves. At three teeth off, or if the timing belt broke, the pistons would hit and bend the open valves as they coasted to a stop.

On later models starting around 2001 or 2002, the engine would still run if the signal was lost from one of those two sensors while it was still running, but once stopped, it wouldn't restart with that one missing signal. My understanding is now they will start and run with one missing signal but I haven't run into that myself yet.

You don't have to go to the dealer for the charging system test. Most independent shops can handle that, and some do it for free. It only takes half a minute once the cables are hooked up.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Saturday, December 5th, 2015 AT 7:52 PM
Tiny
360DARYL
  • MEMBER
I see thank you very much for all of your knowledge you have been passing to me very appreciated.
Myself I enjoy finding out the problems I have with my vehicles and getting rid of them, but sometimes is always good to hear someone like yourself who has a good sense of knowledge in the field of motor vehicles
Thank you
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Saturday, December 5th, 2015 AT 8:47 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
You're welcome. If I don't know the answer, and it appears you don't either, I'll be happy to make something up!
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Saturday, December 5th, 2015 AT 9:06 PM

Please login or register to post a reply.

Recommended Guides