How to change the timing belt

Tiny
KINETIK74
  • MEMBER
  • 2004 ISUZU RODEO
  • 6 CYL
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 120,000 MILES
Is there a guide on how to change the timing belt on a 2004 rodeo somewhere? Its 3.2L 4WD engine. A video would be perfect but I can't find any online.
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Saturday, March 26th, 2011 AT 7:05 PM

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Tiny
IMPALASS
  • MEMBER
Hello

It looks like this guide has the instructions on how to change out the timing belt step by step

https://www.2carpros.com/diagrams/isuzu/rodeo/2004

Please run down these guides and report back.
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Monday, March 28th, 2011 AT 12:01 AM
Tiny
ALL4THEGOAL
  • MEMBER
  • 2002 ISUZU RODEO
  • 135,000 MILES
Okay so my isuzu 3.2 v6 is all messed we replaced the timing belt and did like every thing that a machanic would do but still the cams dont match up with the moter when the moter reaches compression stage instead of both valves being closed exaust stays open no mater what we we cant get it to work please help !
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Saturday, June 20th, 2020 AT 10:35 AM (Merged)
Tiny
RASMATAZ
  • EXPERT
Put the engine no.1 piston on its compression/TDC and then line up the cam and crank shafts markings
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Saturday, June 20th, 2020 AT 10:35 AM (Merged)
Tiny
KHLOW2008
  • EXPERT
The camshaft would tend to run away so you need to hold them in position while installing the belt.
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Saturday, June 20th, 2020 AT 10:35 AM (Merged)
Tiny
KHLOW2008
  • EXPERT
https://www.2carpros.com/questions/1999-isuzu-rodeo-need-step

Refer to the above link.
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Saturday, June 20th, 2020 AT 10:35 AM (Merged)
Tiny
PP
  • MEMBER
  • 1999 ISUZU RODEO
  • 6 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 130,000 MILES
I need to change water pump and timing belt, can you help me?
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Saturday, June 20th, 2020 AT 10:36 AM (Merged)
Tiny
KHLOW2008
  • EXPERT
REMOVAL & INSTALLATION
CAUTION: This application may be an interference engine. DO NOT rotate camshaft or crankshaft when timing belt is removed, or engine damage may occur.

TIMING BELT

Removal

1. Disconnect negative battery cable. Remove air cleaner assembly. Remove upper fan shroud. Relieve tension on serpentine drive belt tensioner and remove serpentine drive belt.

2. Remove 4 cooling fan assembly mounting nuts and remove cooling fan assembly. Remove cooling fan drive pulley. Remove serpentine drive belt idler pulley assembly. Remove serpentine drive belt tensioner assembly.

3. Remove power steering pump with hoses attached, and set aside. Using Crankshaft Holder (J-8614-01) or equivalent, hold crankshaft from turning and remove crankshaft pulley bolt. Remove crankshaft pulley.

4. Disconnect harness connector from right side timing belt cover (if equipped). Remove timing belt covers in this order: right, left, then lower. Remove fan bracket (if equipped).

5. Rotate crankshaft to align timing marks. See Fig. 1 and Fig. 2. When timing marks are aligned, No. 2 piston will be at TDC.

6. If reusing timing belt, mark belt with arrow to indicate original rotation direction. Also place mating marks on timing belt and camshaft sprockets for reassembly reference. Remove timing belt tensioner, and set aside with push rod facing up. Remove timing belt.

CAUTION: To prevent air from entering timing belt tensioner, tensioner rod must always face up.

Installation

NOTE: This information outlines the proper steps to index the camshafts with the crankshaft. In the event that camshaft timing has been disrupted, due to timing belt breakage or camshafts/crankshaft being rotated without a timing belt, this is important prior to timing belt installation. Due to the gear-ration used by each camshaft pulley to drive the camshafts, engine timing cannot be indexed conventionally.

To compress tensioner pusher, place in soft-jawed vice. Slowly compress tensioner pusher pin until it lines up with the two small holes in tensioner pusher housing. Insert a straightened heavy duty paper clip through holes in housing. This will hold the pin in it's compressed position.

IMPORTANT: In the following procedure, the references to 9 or 12 O'clock positions are based on deck plane of the cylinder deck-to-cylinder head mating surface (as viewed from the front of the engine), and NOT relative to the shop floor.

Fig. 3: Timing Belt Installation Procedure (Steps 1-4)
Courtesy of ISUZU MOTOR CO.

Fig. 4: Timing Belt Installation Procedure (Steps 5-8)
Courtesy of ISUZU MOTOR CO.

Fig. 5: Timing Belt Installation Procedure (Steps 9-14)
Courtesy of ISUZU MOTOR CO.

Fig. 6: Timing Belt Installation Procedure (Steps 15-21)
Courtesy of ISUZU MOTOR CO.

Fig. 7: Timing Belt Installation Procedure (Steps 22-23)
Courtesy of ISUZU MOTOR CO.

Fig. 8: Timing Belt Installation Procedure (Steps 23 (Cont.)-24)
Courtesy of ISUZU MOTOR CO.

Fig. 9: Timing Belt Installation Procedure (Steps 25-26)
Courtesy of ISUZU MOTOR CO.

Fig. 10: Timing Belt Installation Procedure (Steps 27-28)
Courtesy of ISUZU MOTOR CO.

Fig. 11: Timing Belt Installation Procedure (Steps 29-30)
Courtesy of ISUZU MOTOR CO.

WATER PUMP
Removal & Installation
Drain cooling system.
Remove timing belt.
Remove idler pulley.
Remove water pump bolts, water pump and gasket.

To install, reverse removal procedure.
Ensure gasket surfaces are clean.
Tighten water pump bolts in sequence to specification.
See Fig. 15.
Fill cooling system and check system for leaks.
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Saturday, June 20th, 2020 AT 10:36 AM (Merged)
Tiny
SUE HANDY
  • MEMBER
  • 2002 ISUZU RODEO
  • 2.2L
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 112,000 MILES
When replacing a head gasket we had to remove the timing belt. We cannot get it in time. We need to know how to time the engine and where the timing marks are located. We have tried multiple times to set this. One time the car spurted and popped. We realize there are marks to set this by but we have been unable to locate them.
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Saturday, June 20th, 2020 AT 10:36 AM (Merged)
Tiny
MHPAUTOS
  • EXPERT
Engines should be set at the timing position prior to any removal work, these are an interference type engine, that is if the valve timing is not set correctly engine damage may occur as the valves will strike the pistons and they will bend. See pic for correct alignment, but I do feel that if it was more than a few teeth out you have now bent valves in the head.
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Saturday, June 20th, 2020 AT 10:36 AM (Merged)
Tiny
JPITZER
  • MEMBER
  • 1999 ISUZU RODEO
  • 6 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 150,000 MILES
My timing belt was replaced and the guy that replaced it said the computer needed to be reset. It has no acceleration.
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Saturday, June 20th, 2020 AT 10:36 AM (Merged)
Tiny
MHPAUTOS
  • EXPERT
Hi there,

if the timing belt is replaced there is no need to touch the computer, I would be checking that he has set the valve timing when the belt was refitted first.

Mark (mhpautos)
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Saturday, June 20th, 2020 AT 10:36 AM (Merged)
Tiny
KOALAZ425
  • MEMBER
  • 1998 ISUZU RODEO
  • 136 MILES
My water pump on my 98 Isuzu Rodeo Went out and I had to replace it, It is driven by the timing belt. I tried to mark it so that I wouldnt lose time on it, but either the top or the bottom is off by just a little it seems is there any helpful tips to help me get it back into time or am I screwed.
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Saturday, June 20th, 2020 AT 10:37 AM (Merged)
Tiny
ASEMASTER6371
  • EXPERT
It would help if we had an engine size

Roy
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Saturday, June 20th, 2020 AT 10:37 AM (Merged)
Tiny
KOALAZ425
  • MEMBER
Its a 2.2 5 speed 4 cyl
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Saturday, June 20th, 2020 AT 10:37 AM (Merged)
Tiny
COJERY
  • MEMBER
  • 1999 ISUZU RODEO
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • MANUAL
  • 140,000 MILES
The car had the timing belt changed at 60000 miles by the dealer recall campaign. I had a local shop change belt all pulleys, tensioner and water pump at 136000 miles. Looks like they used an aftermarket belt. The belt broke after 4000 miles. Damaged valves when belt broke. Repair shop can't tell me why belt broke?
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Saturday, June 20th, 2020 AT 10:37 AM (Merged)
Tiny
BLUELIGHTNIN6
  • EXPERT
4,000 miles and timing belt breaks is a good sign of the belt being installed incorrectly or the belt had a flaw in it prior to installation. In either event there is no way to prove whos at fault
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Saturday, June 20th, 2020 AT 10:37 AM (Merged)
Tiny
JONATHAN1990
  • MEMBER
  • 1998 ISUZU RODEO
  • 3.2L
  • V6
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 175,000 MILES
My 98 Rodeo overheats after about 20 mins of idling or 5 mins of driving, depending on the RPMs or speed. I have replaced the thermostat, water pump, radiator, radiator cap, clutch fan, serpentine belt, timing belt, timing belt tensioner, a few of the water hoses, and even the alternator to ensure proper power from the electrical system. I have put a lot of time and money into solving this issue, but I still have not resolved it. I am completely stumped as to why it is still overheating. Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
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Saturday, June 20th, 2020 AT 10:37 AM (Merged)
Tiny
HMAC300
  • EXPERT
Have a pro pressure check the coolant system for a head gasket leak
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Saturday, June 20th, 2020 AT 10:37 AM (Merged)
Tiny
JOHNNYT73
  • EXPERT
Plug in a scan tool that can read actual temperature from the computer and compare it to what it says on the dash. May just be a bad temp sensor. Are you sure you are burping the air out of the system?
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Saturday, June 20th, 2020 AT 10:37 AM (Merged)
Tiny
JONATHAN1990
  • MEMBER
I have narrowed it down to either a blockage in the block, a bad head gasket, of a cracked head. There is no water in the oil but there is definitely moisture coming through the exhaust.
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Saturday, June 20th, 2020 AT 10:37 AM (Merged)

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