2002 Oldsmobile Aurora CV shaft

Tiny
WERNERMAN
  • MEMBER
  • 2002 OLDSMOBILE AURORA
  • 3.5L
  • V6
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 140,000 MILES
When driving, there is a whining or grinding sound coming from the front left, that gets consistently higher pitched at higher vehicle speed. The brakes and bearings are new. Could it be the CV shaft?
Do you
have the same problem?
Yes
No
Monday, January 26th, 2015 AT 12:48 PM

5 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
If this noise was there shortly after the wheel bearings were replaced, it is likely due to improper installation procedures. Some people set the vehicle on the ground with the wheel installed to hold the axle shaft from spinning when they tighten the nut. At that point the new bearing has already been damaged and will be noisy. There must never be any weight on the bearing when the axle nut is not torqued to specs.

That brings up the second cause of a noisy wheel bearing. That's to not torque it properly with a click-type torque wrench. Almost all front wheel bearings call for at least 180 foot-pounds of torque, which is a real lot, but most GM front-wheel-drive cars call for 240 foot-pounds.

This assumes the noise you're hearing sounds like an airplane engine.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Monday, January 26th, 2015 AT 12:59 PM
Tiny
WERNERMAN
  • MEMBER
It made the noise before I replaced the bearing. I thought it was the bearing because the bearing was bad. It had some play in it. But after replacing it, the noise was still there.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Monday, January 26th, 2015 AT 1:06 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Did you read what I wrote about improper installation procedures?

Were both bearings replaced? If not, how was it determined which one was noisy?
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Monday, January 26th, 2015 AT 2:03 PM
Tiny
WERNERMAN
  • MEMBER
It's making the same noise that it made before the bearings were replaced. Before I replaced the bearings, the noise was coming from the front left, and I assumed the noise was coming from the bearing. I jacked the car up, taking the weight off of the front left wheel, and it had quite a bit of wiggle in it, indicating a bad bearing, so I went ahead and replaced the bearing. I always replace the bearings on both sides, even if only one side is bad. The bearings were properly installed and torqued to specs. With no weight being placed on the axle shaft until the job was done. After replacing the bearings, the noise is still there. The CV boot is intact. The car has 140,000 miles on it, and the CV shafts are original.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Monday, January 26th, 2015 AT 2:30 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Dandy. The next suspect would probably be a rubbing splash shield behind one of the rotors. I've also run into a few axle shaft seals that make a squeaking noise but those were on Chrysler products. The way to find that is to spray any type of light lubricant into the opening of the transmission where the inner cv joint goes in. You have to douse it pretty good to get enough to run all the way in there. If it's a noisy seal, that oil will quiet it down for up to a day, but that's it. The only permanent fix is to replace the seal.

There is a tool you might be able to borrow or rent from an auto parts store that borrows them called the "Chassis Ear". It is a set of six microphones, a switch box, and headphones. You clip the microphones to suspect points, then drive around while listening with the headphones. You can move the microphones around to zero in on the source of the noise. Be aware that many mechanics have never seen or even heard of this tool. Suspension and alignment mechanics use it to find rattles, squeaks, and other noises.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
+1
Monday, January 26th, 2015 AT 3:10 PM

Please login or register to post a reply.

Recommended Guides