Chargeing system

Tiny
DARYLE
  • MEMBER
  • 2001 DODGE TRUCK
  • 6 CYL
  • 2WD
  • MANUAL
  • 213,000 MILES
Y is my dodge diesel over chargeing I replaced altinator computer an batteries
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Monday, April 11th, 2011 AT 9:15 PM

5 Replies

Tiny
RASMATAZ
  • MEMBER
Check fuse no.3 and generator fuse in PDC-if okay test wiring back to the computer and alternator
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Monday, April 11th, 2011 AT 9:26 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
First verify it really is over-charging. Use an inexpensive digital voltmeter to measure battery voltage while the engine is running. It should be between 13.75 and 14.75 volts. If it is higher than 15.0 volts, the problem is with the voltage regulator circuit, not the alternator. He is just doing what he is told to do.

Measure the voltages on the two small terminals on the back of the alternator while the engine is running. One will have full battery voltage. The other one is the secret. It must be lower but not 0 volts. If you find 2 - 6 volts, the voltage regulator inside the Engine Computer is shorted. It is not possible for it to draw that voltage all the way down to 0 volts.

If you find 0 volts on that second terminal, the green wire between the alternator and computer is grounded.
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Monday, April 11th, 2011 AT 9:38 PM
Tiny
DARYLE
  • MEMBER
I'll try that thanks so muct I'll let u no what I find
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Monday, April 11th, 2011 AT 10:58 PM
Tiny
DARYLE
  • MEMBER
I traced the green wire it runs from the back of the altinator acrost the front of the motor.
Then back across the rear of the motor into a plug on top of the fuel filter houseing. The bracket that holds the plugs had came loose and the green wire was the only one rubd. It had shorted out there. I moved it and fixd the problem. Thank you for the tip I realy appreciate your help.
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Tuesday, April 12th, 2011 AT 1:29 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
All right; one in a row! Happy to hear it's solved. To add another dimension to the story, too many do-it-yourselfers think the answer to a broken or grounded wire is to just "run a new wire". When troubleshooting my "bugged" cars, students had to tell me the best typical, most economical repair. They learned real soon that "run a new wire" was never acceptable. They needed to locate the cause of the problem because otherwise how long would it be before the next wire in the harness rubbed through on that sharp bracket or melted to the hot exhaust part.
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Tuesday, April 12th, 2011 AT 3:15 AM

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