2000 Honda Civic No spark condition when hot

Tiny
J02WS6TRANSAM
  • MEMBER
  • 2000 HONDA CIVIC
  • 1.6L
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • MANUAL
  • 120,000 MILES
Hello. I have a 2000 Honda civic ex 1.6. When the car is cold is starts up and drives fine, but after a while of driving or sitting idling the car will shut off and not restart. It will just crank over. The car looses spark. I have tested each plug wire with a spark tester and no spark at all. I knew it could be the coil or icm so I just bought a entire NEW distributor which came with all new components inside. The car does the same thing. Runs fine when cold but once it gets warm, the engine dies and wont restart until it sits for 5 hours or so and cools down. Same no spark issue. Very weird since the coil, icm and all those components are new. I dont know what else it could be. Please help!
Thank you for your time
Jon
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Friday, October 9th, 2015 AT 2:10 PM

3 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
The ignition coil and module are the last things to suspect. They have very low failure rates. What you're describing is typical of a failing crankshaft position sensor or camshaft position sensor. Those often fail by becoming heat-sensitive, then they work again after they cool down.

The first thing you should do is check the diagnostic fault codes. The people at many auto parts stores will do that for you for free. If the Engine Computer had sufficient time to detect the missing sensor signal before the engine stopped rotating, the code will tell you which circuit to look at. Often no fault code is set. In that case, I know that with Chrysler products and their scanner, it will display those sensors with a "no" or "present" during cranking to indicate if the signals are being received. I don't know if Honda has that capability, but regardless, you would need a scanner capable of showing that information.

Normally we want to perform some electrical tests in any circuit to rule everything else out before moving to the sensor itself, but based on the way your engine is acting, it's a pretty good bet the sensor is the cause of the stalling and not some other wiring or connector problem.
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Friday, October 9th, 2015 AT 3:38 PM
Tiny
J02WS6TRANSAM
  • MEMBER
The coils and icm on these hondas are very problematic and usually the culprit. But not in this case. The car has a crank and cam sensor that is built into the distributor. So they would all be new with the new distributor. There is also a sensor on the front of the motor called the crankshaft fluctuation sensor. Not sure if that could be causing my issue or not.
Any thoughts?
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Saturday, October 10th, 2015 AT 5:32 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Yup. There's three versions of the 1.6L engine and all of them show a distributor with separate cam and crank sensors. You're going to have to figure out which of us is wrong by looking at your engine, but if you think about this logically, you can't measure crankshaft timing with a sensor in the distributor. That one can only measure camshaft timing. There wouldn't be any point to having two sensors in the distributor measuring the same thing.
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Saturday, October 10th, 2015 AT 8:27 PM

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