1988 Areostar Overheating

Tiny
COACHME
  • MEMBER
  • 1988 FORD AEROSTAR
  • 6 CYL
  • 213,000 MILES
7 weeks ago I purchased a 1988 F. Areo Van. No check lights on. No leaks underneath. No over heating. No smoke to give me any signal something is a problem. 8 days ago ( after 40 minutes @ 60 mph I heard a pop. Pulled off freeway 10 minutes later (thought I had a flat tire) it was steaming hot white under hood. The upper radiator hose busted. Wait 3 hours van starts up. Yeah only 2 blocks. Away. Same street.A shop confirms and fixes it. Huum so I thought! The next day I phone the owner to inform still Overheating at very Short distances. Drive 15 min and coolant leaking. He stated he ll check radiator cap. Oh it'd very old and there alot of pressure here. Checks fluids change cap I'm up and out. Next day same repeat. 40 min away can't get to him. I phoned but got no where. He asking me questions like I'm a mechanic to troubleshoot. I don't know. Instructed to find a near me mechanic so I just didn't bother to go back to him yet until I can get a 2nd & 3 Rd opinion. There fore I have to fill it up with water this week drive 40 min 55_60 mph wait 2 hours in car ( I just do it I'm sure it doesn't take 2 hours at all- being safe - loosing time& $) fill with water and repeat. Help. He previously stated while fixing that I had a tiny radiator lead that was so small hardly dripping that it may be the reason the hose busted initially without there being a puddle under my van. He charged$8 to put in some sealant. All I know is my van isn't running any better still overheating which makes coolant puddle after I paid him. To replace upper radiator hose NEW CAP and sealant
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Friday, February 12th, 2016 AT 10:05 AM

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Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
What is the question? Why are you bothering the previous owner? This isn't his problem, especially after driving for many weeks with no problems. Did you expect him to fix things that hadn't broken yet?

Radiator hoses pop all the time. Auto parts stores are full of them because people are buying them. The fact that an old hose popped a leak is proof there had to have been pressure in the cooling system, and that means there were no leaks at that time.

The concern here is driving for ten minutes after hearing the hose blow out. You should have seen the temperature gauge rising. Ten minutes can do a lot of damage to an overheating engine.

It sounds like your concern is over the $8.00. If that was for some magic leak sealer, you got what you paid for; a can of chemicals, and nothing more. I'm not understanding what else you expected or what other running problem you're referring to. The rest of your description is real hard to make sense of.
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Friday, February 12th, 2016 AT 10:35 AM
Tiny
COACHME
  • MEMBER
I'm sorry it's my first time on here. I don't know why you believe I was bothering the previous owner..I've NEVER phoned him. I gave you background info on the STATE OF THE CAR when I purchased it. Not to much wrong that I could see. The mechanic I paid to fix the upper hose change cap. Check fluids. Put in sealant was the guy I had to return to several time due to the same thing happening which I believed I paid to have fixed. The question is what do have have checked or fixed now? The upper hose may have been replaced NEW CAP and sealant yet I stated still overheating then leaks underneath.I'm not a mechanic I can't say where the leak is from.I merey overheating. Then see fluid on the ground and choose to wait a bit to cool off. Please calm down I'm not petty $8 ( I only mentioned this piece because mechanic stated sealant should do it for what he saw for now) Im blessed to be a blessing. Believe me. I paid him alot more to fix it. I just got a decent deal for 1988 passed all smog and wonder if it's worth $$$ to keep and fix. Ive actually already did the work I needed the van for in which my car couldnt. Would need to know what's going on maybe that's all. Might be worth keeping
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Friday, February 12th, 2016 AT 11:01 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
"The next day I phone the owner... "

I understand now that eight bucks was just for the leak-stopping chemical, and you paid separately for the hose repair, but you didn't actually say that at first.

My first concern is why a chemical was added. While it may not hurt anything, as I mentioned previously, the hose popped because there was pressure in the cooling system, like there is supposed to be. That means there was no leak up to that point. Normally we would replace the hose, recommend they all be replaced if they weren't recently since they all rot at about the same rate, refill the coolant, burp the air out of the system, and send you on your way.

The fact there is an overheating problem now leaves two conditions to consider. First, the ruptured hose could have been caused by a problem that just started while you were driving a few days ago, and it was the first casualty. The underlying cause could still be there. Most commonly that would be a leaking cylinder head gasket, although your engine is not noted for that. Regardless, your mechanic can perform a chemical test at the radiator to check for that. It only takes a few minutes. The test involves drawing air from the radiator, while the engine is running, through a glass cylinder with two chambers partially-filled with a special dark blue liquid. If combustion gases are leaking into the cooling system, that liquid will turn bright yellow.

The second thing to consider is the current overheating problem is the RESULT of the blown hose. The most common cause for that is air in the system that didn't bleed out by itself, but that should have occurred by now.

The first thing that must be done is to determine where the coolant is leaking from. I have a suspicion it is simply running out of the overflow bottle. That is not exactly a leak. Coolant is supposed to go into that jug when the engine warms up, then it gets sucked back into the engine when it cools down. During overheating, too much coolant goes into the bottle, and it can be boiling. That will make it spit out the overflow tube and can make a mess.

If testing does not indicate a head gasket is leaking, other suspects include a radiator that's blocked by a butterfly collection or some other debris, cooling fins corroded off the radiator, (this is more common in northern states where they throw a pound of salt on an ounce of snow), or a thermostat that's stuck closed. Check for proper radiator fan operation too. A problem with that will cause overheating at slower speeds. The fan is not needed at highway speeds because natural airflow is sufficient to cool the radiator.
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Friday, February 12th, 2016 AT 11:43 AM
Tiny
COACHME
  • MEMBER
Thank you very much for your direction. I appreciate it. Continue to stay in the know for people like me whom simply have a question! Enjoy
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Friday, February 12th, 2016 AT 11:57 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Yup. Be warned though, I had a major house fire two years ago, so now I have to drive into town to use my library's wireless internet. I may be here every day or every other day. Don't assume I'm ignoring you. Sometimes I'm here early in the morning, and sometimes late at night.
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Friday, February 12th, 2016 AT 12:09 PM

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