Mechanics

MODELS FUEL PUMP PRESSURE

1995 Chevrolet Other

Engine Performance problem
1995 Other Chevrolet Models V8 Four Wheel Drive Manual 148000 miles

1995 chevy 2500 4w drive 5.7. Replaced in tank fuel pump twice. Parts from napa both pump have only 8psi. Pump spec are 12-15psi. Checked ground, volted, replaced relay, pressure regulator.&Amp; fuel lines. Also ran fuel pump out tank with out filter 8-9psi. Changed pressure guage 3 times to varify. Truck has very little power. Will the lack of pressure affected the power of the truck? PS TBI Help upset
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Justjim20b
July 25, 2009.




TBI system-the fuel pressure specification should be 9-13psi

Fuel Pump Checks
One of the first things to check is the fuel pump. Does the pump run when the engine is cranking? The pump should make a little noise. No noise would tell you the pump is not spinning.

On most vehicles the pump is energized by the PCM via a relay. When the ignition key is first turned on, the PCM energizes the fuel pump relay for a couple of seconds so the pump will run to build up pressure. The PCM then shuts off the fuel pump relay (which turns off the pump) if it does not receive an rpm signal from the engine indicating the engine has started after cranking. The pump circuit also may be wired though an oil pressure switch and/or an inertia safety switch that kills the pump in case of an accident. Refer to the wiring diagram to find out what is involved before jumping to any conclusions.

Other electrical problems that can affect the pump include low voltage in the pump's power supply circuit or high resistance in the pump's ground connection. Either may prevent the pump from running or spinning fast enough to generate normal fuel pressure.

Measuring Fuel Pump Pressure
Depending on the application, the fuel system may require anywhere from 30 to 80 psi of fuel pressure to start and run. NOTE: Fuel injected engines are VERY sensitive to fuel pressure. If pressure at the engine fuel rail is even a couple pounds less than specifications, the engine may not start or run well, or experience hesitation or stalling problems.

Pressure specifications will vary according to the type of fuel injection system on the engine as well as the performance, fuel economy and emission requirements of that particular model year vehicle. There are no rules of thumb. Every application is different, so always look up the pressure specs when troubleshooting fuel-related performance problems.

When there is too much fuel pressure, the engine runs rich. This causes an increase in fuel consumption and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions. An engine that is running really rich also may experience a rough idle, surging and possibly even carbon-fouled spark plugs.

When there is not enough fuel pressure, the engine may not start. Or if it does, it may idle roughly and run poorly. Low fuel pressure creates a lean fuel condition that can cause lean misfire, hesitation, rough idle, hesitation and misfire on acceleration.

To check fuel pressure, you need a gauge and a place to attach it. There are a number of different checks that can be made, including static or rest pressure (key on, engine off), residual fuel pressure, running pressure, maximum or " dead head" pressure and volume of fuel delivered. The fuel pressure regulator also should be tested, and a fuel pressure drop test performed to check for dirty fuel injectors.

Different vehicle manufacturers recommend different test procedures. On many European EFI systems, the OEMs recommend using a static pressure test with the engine and ignition off. This is done by bypassing the fuel pump relay and energizing the pump directly. Most domestic and Asian vehicle manufacturers, on the other hand, provide a test fitting on the fuel rail so pressure can be checked with the engine running.

If you are working on a vehicle that does not have a pressure test fitting, you will have to tee a pressure gauge into the fuel line just ahead of the injector fuel rail.

Caution: Before hooking up your pressure gauge, relieve all pressure in the fuel system.

Static Fuel Pressure Test
With the key on, engine off (or with the fuel pump energized), fuel pressure should come up quickly and hold steady at a fixed value. Compare the pressure reading to specifications. If you get no pressure reading, check for voltage at the pump. If there is voltage but the pump is not running, you have found the problem: a bad fuel pump.

If you do get a pressure reading but the reading is lower than normal, the cause may be a weak pump, a blockage in the fuel line, filter or tank inlet sock, or a faulty pressure regulator. Also, low voltage at the pump may prevent it from spinning fast enough to build up normal pressure. Check the voltage at the pump. If OK, check the fuel filter and lines for obstructions and the operation of the fuel pressure regulator before you condemn the pump.

Residual Fuel Pressure Test
When the pump is turned off or stops running, the system should hold residual pressure for several minutes (look up the specs to see how much pressure drop is allowed over a given period of time). If pressure drops quickly, the vehicle may have a leaky fuel line, a leaky fuel pump check valve, a leaky fuel pressure regulator or one or more leaky fuel injectors. Low residual fuel pressure can cause hard starting and vapor lock during hot weather.

Running Fuel Pressure Test
With the engine idling, compare the gauge reading to specifications. Fuel pressure should be within the acceptable range given by the vehicle manufacturer. If low, the problem may be a weak pump, low voltage to the pump, a clogged fuel filter, line or inlet sock inside the fuel tank, a bad pressure regulator, or nearly empty fuel tank.

Dead Head Pressure
This checks the maximum output pressure of the fuel pump. With the return line pinched shut, the pump should produce two times its normal operating pressure at idle. If the pressure rating does not go up with the return line blocked, the pump may not be able to deliver enough fuel at higher engine speeds. Possible causes include a worn pump, low voltage at the pump, a plugged fuel filter or inlet sock in the tank, an obstructed fuel line or almost empty fuel tank.

Fuel Volume Test
A fuel pump that delivers normal pressure may still cause driveability problems if it can't deliver enough fuel volume to meet the engine's needs. A fuel volume test may therefore be the best way to evaluate the pump's condition.

A fuel volume test measures the volume of fuel delivered over a specified interval. This test can be done by connecting a fuel flow gauge into the fuel supply line, or by disconnecting the fuel return line from the fuel pressure regulator and connecting a hose from the regulator to a large container. Caution: Make sure there are no open sparks or flames nearby while doing this test!

With the engine off, energize the pump and measure the volume of fuel delivered during the specified interval of time. As a rule, a good pump should deliver about one quart of fuel in 30 seconds.

Causes of low fuel volume delivered include a worn fuel pump, a plugged fuel filter or inlet sock in the tank, obstructed fuel line or nearly empty tank. Don't forget that low voltage at the pump can also prevent it from running fast enough to generate adequate fuel flow. The pump's supply voltage should be within half a volt of normal system voltage. If it is low, check the wiring connectors, relay and ground.

Fuel Pressure Regulator Tests
This test checks the operation of the fuel pressure regulator to make sure it changes line pressure in response to changes in engine vacuum. This is necessary to maintain the proper operating pressure behind the injectors and to compensate for changes in engine load.

With the engine running, disconnect the vacuum hose from the pressure regulator. As a rule, fuel system pressure should increase 8 to 12 psi with the line disconnected. No change would indicate a faulty pressure regulator, or a leaky or plugged vacuum line.

Also, when the vacuum hose is disconnected from the regulator, check the inside of the hose for any wetness that would indicate fuel is being sucked into the hose. There should be none. If the inside of the hose is wet, it means the diaphragm inside the regulator is leaking. This will cause a drop in fuel pressure, and allow fuel to be sucked into the intake manifold upsetting the air/fuel mixture. If the diaphragm is leaking, replace the regulator.

Rasmataz
Jul 25, 2009.


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