Mechanics

CHEVROLET SILVERADO NOISE PROBLEM

2003 Chevrolet Silverado • 73,500 miles

Making a roaring noise when driving. The noise stops when I make a left hand turn. Bearing on passenger side has been changed but it was two years ago. Not sur what might cause it. It almost sounds like a airplane taking off when I speed up.
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RangerMan118
February 15, 2013.




"Sounds like an airplane engine" is the exact description of a noisy wheel bearing.

Caradiodoc
Feb 15, 2013.
Thank you for the response. Is there any way to tell which side. I rocked the wheels back and forth and neither were loose. I just had both upper and lower ball joints replaced thought that may have been the cause. Is there any way to check them without pulling the bearing assembly out?

Tiny
RangerMan118
Feb 15, 2013.
WIth a wheel bearing, it is easy to identify the bad side. When you turn, the vehicle's weight shifts. For example, when you turn left, the weight comes off the left side and is redistributed to the right side. Therefore, there is much less weight on the left wheel bearing and it stops making noise. In your case, that is when the noise goes away. Thus, the wheel bearing on the left side (which the weight moves away from when turning left) is most likely where the problem is. The right side (passenger side) sounds like it is fine. My guess is the sound gets worse when you turn right because more weight is then added to the left wheel bearing.

Let me know if you can understand what I said.

The sound doesn't seem to change any when I turn to the right. It is the worst between 15 and 55 mph. When I am slowing down without using the brakes it sounds really loud. I only have to turn the wheel left about a quarter turn and the sound goes away when I'm traveling about 45. Thank you so much for your responses!

Tiny
RangerMan118
Feb 15, 2013.
There is a tool you might be able to borrow or rent from an auto parts store that borrows them called the "Chassis Ear". It is a set of six microphones, a switch box, and headphones. You clip the microphones to suspect points, then drive around while listening with the headphones. You can move the microphones around to zero in on the source of the noise. Be aware that many mechanics have never seen or even heard of this tool. Suspension and alignment mechanics use it to find rattles, squeaks, and other noises.

Identifying the side by turning a little, as in changing lanes, always worked on the older pressed-in bearings on Chrysler products in the '80s, but when they went to the bolt-on assembly like GM uses that trick could not be counted on. On most of the models by the early '90s the sound did not change when turning slightly, and when it sounded like the noise was coming from a certain side, I was wrong 50 percent of the time because noise travels and can be misleading. The only sure-fire way I ever found was to run the car on a hoist and listen next to each bearing with a stethoscope. One would sound a little rough, but then the bad one would be MUCH louder. Harbor Freight Tools and most auto parts stores have stethoscopes for less than ten bucks.

Some people say you can feel the bad one if you hold your fingertips on the spring while you rotate the tire by hand. I've never tried that myself.

Caradiodoc
Feb 15, 2013.
Thank you for the help! Going to give it a try and see what u come up with. I was worried it might be the cv joint going out!
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Tiny
RangerMan118
Feb 15, 2013.

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