2000 Toyota Corolla catalytic converter

Tiny
SENMEHMET
  • MEMBER
  • 2000 TOYOTA COROLLA
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 160,000 MILES
Hi,
my check engine light just came out after I drove my car from Texas to Boston. I took it Toyota dealer for diagnostic, and they told me that I need new catalytic converter, and price is 1800. I went to Autoparts and asked for the price of this part. It varies from 80 to 250. As I understand, there are two types of them, federal and California. Mine is saying that it has to conform both Federal and California, a sticker under the hood.

Here are my two question.
How difficult is it to replace this part? I can see the part under the car. If I can raise the car, I feel like I can unscrew the bolts holding old catalytic converter and put the new one on! It is really really expensive to replace this catalytic converter in other shops as well. I went to another shop, and they asked for 1200.

Secondly, If I just buy universal and direct fit catalytic converter, would it be fine? Or What type of converter should I buy for my car? I want this check engine light gone.

Thanks

msen
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Saturday, May 30th, 2009 AT 1:18 PM

3 Replies

Tiny
MMPRINCE4000
  • EXPERT
Most Toyota convertors are bolted on, so unbolt it (treat the studs/nuts with PB Blaster first). So you unbolt it and bolt in new one, also replace gaskets.

Convertors generally fail because of incorrect air/fuel ratio or an impact event (running over a curb for example). Bad O2 sensors can also cause convertor failure.

You are BEST off buying a direct replacement that conforms to federal regulations. They are not cheap, but will get rid of the error code.

The universal models are less effecient and would not bring the emmissions up to factory standards.
People that install them do it for one reason, cost.
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Sunday, May 31st, 2009 AT 6:52 AM
Tiny
SENMEHMET
  • MEMBER
Thank you for the reply. Interestingly, yesterday somehow check engine light is gone. I was just driving, and saw thankfully. I am throwing my wild card and guessing that my car is not running efficiently probably due to old spark-plugs or smt like that. I am planning to use cleaners and replace my spark plugs first, and use higher octane gas, and see how it will go.

Thanks for your reply

msen
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Sunday, May 31st, 2009 AT 10:15 AM
Tiny
MMPRINCE4000
  • EXPERT
DO NOT use higher octane gas. There is false information out there that HO gas "burns cleaner", In fact it burns slower than regular, since it is "less combustble" (best description I could think of) than regular.
It is designed for high compression, or forced induction engines. It is NOT designed for low compression engines and will actually burn slower and cause more problems.

Change plugs, use original Denso (or NGK) plugs and if original were Iridium, use those.
DO NOT USE a steel, copper or multiple ground platinum.

An excellent additive to clean fuel system is a product called "Seafoam".
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Monday, June 1st, 2009 AT 7:30 AM

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