1999 Toyota Corolla I need help!

Tiny
JACKIEE
  • MEMBER
  • 1999 TOYOTA COROLLA
  • 4 CYL
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 14,800 MILES
My car has had break pads put on, and roto and a master cly, and new tires and new shocks complete. My problems has not been fixed yet? When I drive, it happens off and on, when this happens I have to pull over, ok, I will be driving and the car will not go over 30 miles per hours it loses power, ok another thing that happens at the same time, is, the break comes up, and cannot push it down, like its stuck or something. I spend alot already, and the problem is still there, what can you do to help me with what the heck is it. I push on the gas and it just will not go, and the breaks come up on its own, and will not go back down? I have to stop turn off car and try it again, sometimes works sometimes it don't. Please help me so I can tell them to fix it right? Sincerely Ms Wilson.
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Wednesday, March 25th, 2009 AT 1:00 AM

3 Replies

Tiny
MMPRINCE4000
  • EXPERT
Take it back and desribe problem and have them repair it on their dime.

They may have used the wrong MC or other parts. It may be the power brake booster is ruptured, or MC inastalled improperly.
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Wednesday, March 25th, 2009 AT 6:16 AM
Tiny
JACKIEE
  • MEMBER
The guy said when I got the front shocks done, the other guy may not have bleed the breaks, which I have no ideal what that is. And he will not look at it for free of course, so I don't know if I should take it to somewhere new and start over or what? But it does seem after this guy done it my car was fine, then I went and got front shocks done by a friend, And then it seemed to come back on me. Any questions thyat would help me with new place to find out the reason, please give me a call, thank you once again, Ms Wilson.
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Wednesday, March 25th, 2009 AT 1:21 PM
Tiny
MMPRINCE4000
  • EXPERT
The principle by which hydraulics work is that liquids are NOT compressable, while air is.

"Bleeding the brakes" simply means you bleed any air that may have entered the brake system (which is hydraulic). Whenever you remove a hydraulic component on the brakes you MUST bleed the air that has entered the system, or the brake pedal will go to floor or pedal will feel spongy due to air in system.

There are "bleed screws" at each caliper or wheel cylinder that allow bleeding.

The master cylinder is, of course, a major hydraulic component.

If a mechanic changed the MC and did not bleed the brakes, I would avoid him.
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Thursday, March 26th, 2009 AT 7:15 AM

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