1995 Toyota Celica Stalls after warm-up

Tiny
BATMAN61
  • MEMBER
  • 1995 TOYOTA CELICA
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • MANUAL
  • 140,000 MILES
Hello and thank you for your service and attention; Allow me to introduce myself, I'm a 47yr old electrician and consider myself to be technically astute. My debit card balance is embarrassingly low at the moment but should change very soon. The problem is with a 1995 Toyota Celica, 1.8L 7A-FE engine approx 140K. Let me stress, while the engine is warming up it performs beautifully, however, once warm it wants to stall when the throttle is opened. The change is sudden and dramatic and seems to worsen as the temp rises. The "check engine" light DOES NOT come on. I cannot find a vacuum leak. I've tested the TPS, intake air temp and engine coolant temp sensors with an ohmeter and they are all within spec. Interestingly, if I impede the airflow (slightly) at the intake with one hand while operating the throttle with the other hand, it responds properly. When driven by an extremely patient driver, it is possible to feather the throttle until the RPM's come up though I did find myself sitting through a few traffic lights (much to the dismay of those behind me). If this were an older car with a carb and points, I would immediately repair the leak in the vacuum advance but this car seems to be smarter than I am. I might consider investing in a code reader but since the "check engine" light isn't coming on I'm not sure an error code is being registered. What am I missing?
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Tuesday, May 26th, 2009 AT 1:55 AM

5 Replies

Tiny
KHLOW2008
  • EXPERT
Hi Batman61,

For your year model, it is possible to check for trouble code by bridging the TE1 and E1 terminal of the diagnostic connector in engine compartment.


http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/192750_DLC94Previa_1.jpg



Turn ignition switch ON and you would be able to read the blinking of the CEL. If the blinking is constant without any pauses, no codes are available.

You mentioned covering the MAF solves the problem, it could be a dirty or MAF sensor.
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Saturday, June 6th, 2009 AT 9:32 AM
Tiny
BATMAN61
  • MEMBER
KHLow2008
Thank you very much for your response. I do have a Chilton's manual on every car I have. I did check for error codes and there were none. I finally took it to a dealership and after several tech man hours they discovered that the ignition coil (that I had ruled out due to recent replacement) was indeed faulty and it was replaced. Again. They were right, the car runs great now. My only worry going forward is that this car appears to eat coils. I hope it was just a fluke.
Thank you again for your attention.
Batman61
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Saturday, June 6th, 2009 AT 10:11 AM
Tiny
KHLOW2008
  • EXPERT
Ignition coils are electrical components that are hard to predict their durability. As you mentioned, it could be a fluke so we will have to hope it does not happen again.

Near the distributor there is a capacitor which if is faulty, would cause premature failing of the coil. That part should not cost too much and I would suggest replacing it or at least you should check if it is properly grounded or if the wire conditions are good.
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Saturday, June 6th, 2009 AT 10:47 PM
Tiny
BATMAN61
  • MEMBER
Are you referring to the condenser. I tested the existing condenser at.461microfarads. I bought a new one anyway which tested at.458microfarads. Virtually identical, unless there's another capacitor that I don't know about.

Batman61
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Sunday, June 7th, 2009 AT 7:30 AM
Tiny
KHLOW2008
  • EXPERT
Sorry for the mistake. Yes, it is the condenser that I meant.

Sometimes condensers might test ok, however when working they might differ due to heat and others.
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Sunday, June 7th, 2009 AT 8:56 AM

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