1999 Toyota Camry Engine miss

Tiny
CB SIMI
  • MEMBER
  • 1999 TOYOTA CAMRY
  • 6 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 125,000 MILES
I have an off and on engine miss with this car for almost a year. Every time I would get home to work on the car it ran find. A few months ago I the engine check lite came on. I purchased a Innova code reader and found a P0304 and a P0300 code I did some troubleshooting and thought possible a lack fuel might be the trouble. Replaced the fuel filter cleared the codes and the engine ran find for a couple of months. A couple a weeks ago I got the same codes back. In the process of troubleshooting I keep getting more and more codes. I am now up to 14. If I take this car to a Toyota dealer or a well equiped repair shop will they be able to tell me what the trouble is without replacing a lot of parts? Should I clear the codes and start over? I have a OBD2 report with Freeze Frame. How can I sent it to you and would it help?
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Sunday, January 11th, 2009 AT 5:55 PM

17 Replies

Tiny
RASMATAZ
  • MEMBER
Try clearing it-

Random misfire on P0300 and no.4 misfire etc

Misfires can be caused by worn or fouled spark plugs, a weak spark (weak coil, bad spark plug wire), loss of compression, vacuum leaks, anything that causes an unusually lean fuel mixture (lean misfire), an EGR valve that is stuck open, dirty fuel injectors, low fuel pressure, or even bad fuel.
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Sunday, January 11th, 2009 AT 6:10 PM
Tiny
CB SIMI
  • MEMBER
I have inspected and tested with resistance and or voltage the following, spark, spark plugs, spark plug wires, coils, injectors, voltage output from PCM for injectors, fuel pressure, MAF sensor (warm and cold), IAT, camshaft, crankshaft, and ECT sensors, VSV valve, replaced PVC valve and fuel filter. EGR modulator, vacuum and resistance on the EGR valve. I have not removed the EGR. I have used many tanks of gas in the last 10 months. Compression test is normal. Cbs
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Sunday, January 11th, 2009 AT 7:23 PM
Tiny
RASMATAZ
  • MEMBER
Check the no.4 compression and injector-take out the EGR valve and clean it out good. You said you check the fuel pressure what was the readings? Get back we got a long way to go to find this culprit.
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Sunday, January 11th, 2009 AT 8:08 PM
Tiny
CB SIMI
  • MEMBER
Note; Fuel pressure 45 psig static (just turning the engine over) 50 psig with the engine running. Manual calls for 40-50 psig. I will pull the EGR valve tomorrow if I get a chance. Cbs
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Sunday, January 11th, 2009 AT 9:51 PM
Tiny
CB SIMI
  • MEMBER
Compression on # 4 is 120 psig. I have removed the EGR valve and is about the cleanest I have seen, I retested with vacuum and resistance and it checks OK.I cleared the code reader. Warmed the engine up at idle. Engine idled rough.I increased the RPM a couple of times and received a P0505 code (idle control system malfunction)and freeze frame.I did not drive the car so P0300 and P0304 codes have not shown up yet.I will check the idle control system tomorrow. CB.
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Tuesday, January 13th, 2009 AT 10:50 PM
Tiny
CB SIMI
  • MEMBER
With a P0505 code I have pulled the IAC valve from the throttle body and cleaned (was a little sticky) and tested with resistance and voltage. Seams to work correctly. Reinstalled and run at an idle to warm up engine. Received a P1155 code-A/F sensor heater circurt malfunction(bank 2 sensor 1 )resistance at sensor is correct and voltage at ECM is correct. Durning engine warm up also received Codes for P0300 Random engine miss and P0302, P0304, P0306 engine miss. I did not drive car and did not receive any Freeze Frame data. Note' I used a stethosope on the fuel injectors and determinded # 2, 4 and 6 have pause in the clicking about every 2-4 seconds. Will wait your reply. CB.
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Wednesday, January 14th, 2009 AT 10:00 PM
Tiny
RASMATAZ
  • MEMBER
Check the coil, look for vacuum leaks and test the fuel pressure if all okay-try having the computer reflash-
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Thursday, January 15th, 2009 AT 2:43 PM
Tiny
CB SIMI
  • MEMBER
I will recheck coils and for vacuum leaks and fuel pressure. I never heard of a reflash of the computer. I will check my manuals for information on computer reflash. Cb.
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Thursday, January 15th, 2009 AT 8:22 PM
Tiny
CB SIMI
  • MEMBER
In your last reply you stated that I might need to have the computer reflashed. What would cause that need and must this be done at a the Toyota dealer?
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Thursday, January 22nd, 2009 AT 11:05 AM
Tiny
RASMATAZ
  • MEMBER
Have you tested the injectors and coils?

Why Reprogram?

As we said earlier, PCMs may need to be reprogrammed for several reasons. One is to fix factory bugs. Every time Bill Gates rushes yet another version of Windows to market to perpetuate the Microsoft revenue stream, it always turns out to have bugs and security holes that were somehow missed but must be fixed by downloading and installing the latest Windows "service pack." It's a never-ending cycle of upgrades and patches. Fortunately, it is not that bad yet with automotive PCMs, but it has become a crutch for automakers who rush products to market that aren't quite ready. This philosophy of "build it now and fix it later" creates a lot of unnecessary recalls, but at least it gives technicians a way to fix factory mistakes without having to replace any parts.

A reflash may also be required if the factory settings for the OBD II self-diagnostics turn out to be overly sensitive - especially after a few years of operation. The same goes for driveability. What works fine in a brand new car many not work so great after 50,000 or 100,000 miles of real-world driving. Changing the fuel enrichment curve, spark timing or some emissions control function slightly may be necessary to eliminate a hesitation, spark knock or other condition that develops over time.

For example, on certain GM vehicles the Check Engine light comes on and sets a code P1406 that indicates a fault in the position of the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve. Cleaning or replacing the EGR valve and clearing the code does not fix the vehicle because the code usually returns. The real problem is the OBD II programming in the PCM. When the PCM commands the EGR valve to open to check its operation, it isn't allowing enough time for the valve to respond. A brand new valve takes only about 50 milliseconds to open but an older valve may take up to 350 milliseconds or longer - which is not long enough to cause a real NOx emissions failure but is long enough to trip a fault code. The fix in this instance is to reflash the PCM with new instructions that allow more time for the EGR valve to respond.

Another example are rich codes that may appear on some late-model GM vehicles. The problem here is that the original OBD II self-diagnostic programming does not allow enough leeway for changes in intake vacuum that occur as the engine ages. After 60,000 miles, intake vacuum isn't as high as in a new engine, which can create a rich fuel condition. The cure is to flash reprogram the PCM to compensate for the drop in vacuum.

When vehicle manufacturers calibrate the onboard diagnostics to meet federal emissions standards, they have to draw the line somewhere as to what operating conditions might cause emissions to exceed federal limits 1.5 times. That is the threshold where a fault code must be set and the Check Engine light must come on. It doesn't mean emissions really are over the limit, but it is possible based on laboratory dyno testing and field experience. Depending on the application, the vehicle manufacturer may even set the limit a little lower just to be safe because the last thing any OEM wants is an expensive emissions recall.

Unfortunately, vehicle manufacturers don't always tell us their diagnostic strategies or even their operating strategies for their computerized engine control systems. Some service manuals include a fair amount of system background information but others provide almost nothing beyond a basic diagnostic flow chart. Maybe the engineers who design this stuff think technicians only need flow charts and assembly instructions to fix vehicles today. But it often takes a much deeper understanding of the system operating logic to figure out what's setting a particular code - especially when the cause isn't obvious.

The best advice when confronted with a troublesome code that keeps coming back or seems to set for no apparent reason is to check for any technical service bulletins that may have been published. Chances are it might be a programming issue that requires a reflash to fix.

Something else to keep in mind with respect to many late-model flash reprogrammable PCMs: if you replace the PCM for any reason, the replacement unit may have to be reflashed before it will start the engine! Some modules are plug-and-play, and are preprogrammed by the dealer so they can be installed ready-to-go. But many need vehicle specific calibration information to run properly. This may require downloading old calibration information from the original PCM (if possible) and reloading it into the replacement PCM, or getting updated calibration information from the vehicle manufacturer to install in the new module.

Some remanufacturers who supply reconditioned PCMs now flash program PCMs for specific vehicle applications. But to do this, they need vehicle information such as the vehicle identification number (VIN), the type of transmission (manual or automatic), the emissions type (federal certification or California), and other options thqat may affect the calibration of the PCM. Your other option is to flash reprogram the PCM yourself.
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Thursday, January 22nd, 2009 AT 1:26 PM
Tiny
CB SIMI
  • MEMBER
I got a break in the windy weather and was able get some work done on the Camry. I retested the fuel pressure and have 50 psig with the engine running. I retested the coils and the primary resistance on all three is 1.3, 1.4 and 1.4 ohms normal is.85 to 1.10 ohms. The secondary resistance is 13.7, 13.5 and 13.2 k ohms normal is 13.1 to 17.5 k ohms. I then checked the injector resistance and got #2- 14.2-14.3, #4-14.3-14.4 and #6-14.2-14.3 normal is 13.4 to 14.2 ohms. I than conect a vacuum gauge and tach. Cleared all codes and started the engine. Idle was 800 rpm and vacuum was 15 inches. As the engine warmed up the vacuum moved up to 17 inches and the rpm started to move up and down. Engine started to run rough. Engine check light came on and I got a P0505 code and freeze frame(Idle control system malfuction. I tested the IAC idle at the DLC-1 terminal and got a jump in the rpm as required. I then checked the resistance at the IAC terminal which was correct. I applied voltage to the and the valve opened and closed as required. That is as far as I got today. CB Simi
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Saturday, January 31st, 2009 AT 10:44 PM
Tiny
RASMATAZ
  • MEMBER
Test the TPS and MAF sensors
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Sunday, February 1st, 2009 AT 3:04 PM
Tiny
CB SIMI
  • MEMBER
I have completed the following tests. TPS reads 5.05 volts normal is 2.7 to 5.2. MAF terminal #4 reads battery voltage of 12.29V. IAT Back side of connector at engine start reads 2.07k ohms @ 1200 rpm and as engine warms up it drops to 1.25 k ohms @ 900 rpm. As engine gets close to operating temperture it starts to run rough and idle drops to about 680 rpm and resistance goes to.58 to.81 k ohms. Hope this helps. CB Simi
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Tuesday, February 3rd, 2009 AT 6:57 PM
Tiny
RASMATAZ
  • MEMBER
Earlier it was giving all kinds of codes what is it giving now
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Tuesday, February 3rd, 2009 AT 7:05 PM
Tiny
CB SIMI
  • MEMBER
After testing the TPS, MAF an IAT yesterday I ended up with 9 stored DTCs P0300, P0302, P0304, P0306, O0172, P0100, P0110, P0120, P0505 with Freeze Frame and 5 pending DTCs P0300, P0302, P0304, P0306 and P0172. I then cleared all codes and started the engine and ran for 15 to 20 minutes. I received only one stored DTC a P0505 Idle control System with a Freeze Frame. Freeze Frame data for P0505 is as follows. Fuel system 1 closed loop, fuel system 2 closed loop, Cal load value37.23%, engine coolant temp 114.80, short term fuel trim-bank 1 -3.91%, long term fuel trim-bank -1.56%, short term fuel trim-bank 2 --8.59%, long term fuel trim-bank 2 -30.47%, engine rpm 1012, vehicle speed 0.00, intake air 77.00 degrees F. Hope this helps. CB Simi
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Wednesday, February 4th, 2009 AT 8:43 PM
Tiny
RASMATAZ
  • MEMBER
TPS reads 5.05 volts normal is 2.7 to 5.2.

The 5.05 volts reading is it the closed or wide open throttle voltages?
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Wednesday, February 4th, 2009 AT 9:58 PM
Tiny
CB SIMI
  • MEMBER
I did not receive your reply posted Feb 4. I needed to get this car running. On Tuesday Feb 10 I took the car to the local Toyota service and had them check the computer. This model is not able to have the computer reflashed. Had a new computer installed and the keys linked. I picked the car up this afternoon and so far it runs great. Thank you. CB Simi.
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Friday, February 13th, 2009 AT 10:17 PM

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