Timing belt

Tiny
R. STEWARD
  • MEMBER
  • 1994 PLYMOUTH ACCLAIM
  • 3.0L
  • V6
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 147,080 MILES
If belt breaks does this bend the valves?
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have the same problem?
Yes
No
Tuesday, November 22nd, 2016 AT 7:21 AM

6 Replies

Tiny
HMAC300
  • EXPERT
If it is not a dual overhead camshaft engine then it is non interference which means it will not bend valves. If it is single overhead then it is okay.
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Tuesday, November 22nd, 2016 AT 7:37 AM
Tiny
R. STEWARD
  • MEMBER
What it has dual overhead cam?
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Tuesday, November 22nd, 2016 AT 8:13 AM
Tiny
SATURNTECH9
  • EXPERT
If you have the engine you listed it is an interfere fit engine which means it can bend valves when the belt breaks.
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Tuesday, November 22nd, 2016 AT 9:17 AM
Tiny
JOHNNY G.JR
  • MEMBER
Most manufacturers recommend changing timing belts around 60000 miles
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Tuesday, November 22nd, 2016 AT 8:29 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Hi guys. This 3.0L is not an interference engine. I've had many of them. All are dual overhead cam engines in every model and year. This engine is a Mitsubishi-built engine for Chrysler. There is a different Mitsubishi 3.0L that may look similar but it is only used in Mitsubishi-built cars. That one may be an interference engine. The 3.0L in the Dodge Stealth / Mitsubishi 3000GT is still different and is an interference engine in both turbo and non-turbo versions.

Some of the parts stores where we can look up parts incorrectly list Chrysler's 3.0L as an interference engine. I get fooled that way with other engines some times.
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Wednesday, November 23rd, 2016 AT 2:49 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
I should have added that when following belt replacement procedures, there is a spring-loaded tensioner pulley to take up the slack in the belt. Don't rely on that alone as the spring can become weak or the pivoting bracket can stick. Rotate the crankshaft two revolutions in the normal direction, by hand, so the slack is on the back side of the engine by the tensioner pulley, then use a small pry bar to help the spring pull on the pulley. If the belt is left loose, it is really hard for it to jump a tooth on one of the camshaft sprockets, and it is not possible to jump on the crankshaft sprocket, but it can slip over the water pump pulley and lead to the engine running too hot.
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Wednesday, November 23rd, 2016 AT 2:54 PM

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