Replace air conditioner service charge port valve core on GM cars

Tiny
XJSHEN
  • MEMBER
  • 2003 CHEVROLET VENTURE
  • 3.4L
  • V6
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 82,000 MILES
In the valve mouth on the top of core have a rod covered core. How to remove the rod? In order to replace old leaking valve core?
Thanks for your help and instruction!
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Monday, August 1st, 2016 AT 9:51 PM

8 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
All air conditioner valve cores leak. They are only intended to hold the refrigerant in when you remove the charging station hoses until you screw on the caps. The caps have rubber o-rings that seal the port when you are done servicing the system.
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Monday, August 1st, 2016 AT 9:57 PM
Tiny
XJSHEN
  • MEMBER
Thanks for your comment and help!
! I tried to figure out how to replace my leaking A/C valve core by myself. I purchased "R134a A/C Car Air Condition Valve Core Remover Installer No Gas Loss Set of Tool". But there was a rod (ball) covered on the top of valve core. The low A/C service valve is leaking can look at air bulb on the mouth where is rod covered on the valve. My question is should I take out the rod/ball and replace the core? Or I should not take that out? Then, how to replace the leaking valve core?
Thanks for your help!
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Thursday, August 4th, 2016 AT 8:40 PM
Tiny
XJSHEN
  • MEMBER
High A/C service valve port is not leaking even remove the cap while low A/C service valve port is leaking and can look at the air bulble on the mouth between the rod and mouth. And high side pipe is cold indicating compressure is working normal. But air conditioner does not send cold air to cabin. If the pressure is not high enough then leaking? If recharge from low valve port may prevend leaking?
Thanks for your help and instruction and direction!
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Thursday, August 4th, 2016 AT 8:48 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
I'm having a hard time following what you're saying. I never looked inside a port so I'm not familiar with the rod and ball you're referring to. I just charge the systems with the correct measured amount of refrigerant, then screw on the caps. The caps are what seals the ports. The valves just give you time to screw them on. They all leak a little which is why we never let a car go without those caps.

I get nervous when you're talking about removing a valve core because refrigerant is extremely dangerous to work with. It can cause blindness and frostbite. Mechanics wear gloves and safety glasses, and the smart ones wear a face shield.

I was confused too by your comment about a cold high-side line. The high side is where the refrigerant gets pumped into a high-pressure vapor and becomes very hot. It gets cold where a low pressure liquid turns to vapor, which is supposed to be in the evaporator in the dash. If the system is fully-charged and there is a place under the hood where a line is getting cold, that is the point of a restriction in that line.
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Thursday, August 4th, 2016 AT 9:24 PM
Tiny
XJSHEN
  • MEMBER
Thanks for your comment!
Once open low A/C port valve cap on the non-GM cars, the valve core can be seen and can be reached to valve core with "R134a A/C Car Air Condition Valve Core Remover Installer" to replace leaking core.
This is safe and secure procedure for replaceing the leaking core ( many video on the YouTube). But on the GM cars it is impossible directly reach the valve core with the tool. Without remove the rod/ball can not reach to the valve core.
My High pressure A/C port valve is ot leaking, only low port valve is leaking. If GM cars do not have valve core instead have a rod/ball to control the valve?
Thanks!
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Thursday, August 4th, 2016 AT 9:39 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
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I'm getting the feeling you're running into a problem common with GM vehicles for the past few decades. They like to design and build their cars with assemblies rather than individual parts. Examples include their generators and their distributors. Both were self-contained assemblies that were expected to be replaced as assemblies. They were not expected to be diagnosed and repaired. That came later with parts made available by aftermarket suppliers. The advantage to this was the cars went together on the assembly lines much faster, and the dealership mechanics didn't have to be trained in how the systems worked or were to be diagnosed. The disadvantage for car owners was they had to buy a complete generator when perhaps just the internal voltage regulator was all that was needed, or they had to buy a whole distributor when maybe the ignition module was the only bad part.

It sounds to me like you are expected to replace the entire hose if you want to replace the valve.
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Thursday, August 4th, 2016 AT 9:53 PM
Tiny
XJSHEN
  • MEMBER
Is it impossible to replace A/C port valve or valve core on the GM cars?
Then why this parts sold in the shop specifically foe GM cars? If the valve leaking have to replace whole line assembly?
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Friday, August 5th, 2016 AT 5:04 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
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I explained how GM designs and builds their cars. They like it when you have to buy a very expensive assembly instead of a little part. When this is the case, the assembly is the only way you can get the part from the dealership.

It's the aftermarket industry that addresses this problem and makes the smaller parts available. If a valve core is available separately, you'll find them at a radiator repair shop or air conditioning shop. The people there will be able to tell you how to replace it.

If the valve IS available at the dealership, they will be able to tell you if a special tool is needed. You might also speak with their AC specialist in the repair shop. He might know of a special trick or procedure.
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Friday, August 5th, 2016 AT 2:04 PM

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