RPM low after having the clutch replaced

Tiny
JASON CURRY
  • MEMBER
  • 2005 DODGE NEON
  • 2.0L
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • MANUAL
  • 150,000 MILES
I just got my clutch replaced and now the rpm is too low to keep my car running.
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Saturday, April 8th, 2017 AT 12:57 PM

2 Replies

Tiny
CJ MEDEVAC
  • EXPERT
It may have lost it is idle memory when the battery was disconnected. This sometimes happens with computer cars.

(We are guessing it all went back together correctly-if not, this below is not the answer!)

Eventually it will relearn on its own,

You may be able to make it 'learn' faster.

I am more into older vehicles and the computer stuff just is not my thing!

There maybe a better way than this, if you do some searching, At the top of our page, in the search box, install "Idle Relearn" that may help or the owner's manual, or the WEB.

The method I was taught to use is:

Find a sort of level stretch of road, that is sparsely traveled

We do not want a car on our butt while doing this!

Get your baby up to 60-65 MPH

Remove your feet from all of the pedals! (Leave it in gear)

Let it coast down to nothingness (until you have to finally keep it from stalling)

That is it!

(see why you do not want company behind you?)

Did the clutch feller observe the situation? If this is not helping, maybe he can recheck his work, electrical connections/ vacuum connections he may have disconnected or accidentally pulled loose.

The Medic
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Saturday, April 8th, 2017 AT 6:25 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Hi CJ. You're right, but it's much easier. Drive at highway speed with the engine warmed up, then coast for at least seven seconds without touching the pedals. The Engine Computer is waiting to see a steady voltage reading from the throttle position sensor, and that the throttle is fully-released. It knows the throttle is released by the higher-than-normal vacuum during coasting. The steady TPS reading only occurs when your foot isn't bouncing on the accelerator pedal.

Once the TPS reading is memorized, the computer will be in control of idle speed any time it sees that voltage again. If you replace the throttle position sensor, there's a 50 percent chance the new minimum reading will be slightly lower, since no two sensors ever read exactly alike. It will immediately put that new voltage in memory, then wait to see that to know it should control idle speed. If the new sensor's minimum voltage is higher, idle speed could be low or erratic until the coasting procedure is done again.
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Monday, April 10th, 2017 AT 11:18 AM

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