1997 Plymouth Voyager cold operation problems

Tiny
PSHEEN
  • MEMBER
  • 1997 PLYMOUTH VOYAGER
  • 6 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 132,000 MILES
When I start my van cold and let it idle it either stalls after running a short time or the RPMS will fluctuate, when driving it's like the vehicle is gasping and sometimes stalls when at low RPM's. This problem is cured when I let the vehicle come to temp then shut off the ignition for a minute then restart.
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Wednesday, November 18th, 2009 AT 7:39 AM

3 Replies

Tiny
MATHIASO
  • MEMBER
The coolant temperature may be the cause.
Fuel, ignition, emissions and drivetrain functions handled by the PCM are affected by the engine's operating temperature. A different operating strategy is used when the engine is cold than when it is warm. This is done to improve cold driveability, idle quality and emissions. Consequently, if the coolant sensor fails or is giving the PCM a false reading, it can upset a lot of things.
This is just a guess, but I will be more precise if you could pull the code for me, or let me know if there is no code(s).
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Wednesday, November 18th, 2009 AT 8:12 AM
Tiny
PSHEEN
  • MEMBER
Coolant temp sensor changed, intake cleaned, ignition coil replaced same problem? Showing multiple cylinder misfire code, oh 50+psi at the rail
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Friday, January 29th, 2010 AT 9:37 AM
Tiny
MATHIASO
  • MEMBER
Hello psheen

Thank you for adding more information about the issue.
The problem is about random misfire right?
The cause is typically a vacuum leak in the intake manifold, throttle body or vacuum plumbing, a defective Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) valve that is leaking exhaust into the intake manifold,
Start by visually inspecting all the vacuum hoses and connections. Look for disconnected, loose or cracked hoses, broken fittings or other obvious problems. Also, listen to the engine while it is idling (outdoors only or with proper exhaust ventilation, NEVER indoors!) Vacuum leaks will often make a sucking or whistling noise.
A faster technique for finding vacuum leaks is to get a bottle of propane and attach a length of rubber hose to the gas valve. Open the valve so you have a steady flow of gas. Then hold the hose near suspected leak points while the engine is idling. If there is a leak, propane will be siphoned in through the leak. The resulting "correction" in the engine air/fuel ratio should cause a noticeable change in idle speed and/or smoothness (Note: you may have to temporarily disconnect the idle speed control motor while doing this test). Use caution because propane is highly flammable and can be ignited by a spark or flame.
this is the vacuum diagram you will need to search for leaks


http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/46384_0900c1528003c537_1.jpg

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Friday, January 29th, 2010 AT 7:50 PM

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