1999 Plymouth Breeze 1999 Plymouth Breeze Idle 10 min shut

Tiny
SFCJDHERRERA
  • MEMBER
  • 1999 PLYMOUTH BREEZE
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 112,000 MILES
My Plymouth Breeze will shut down after ldling for 10-20 min's. It will not shut down with rpm's. There is no service engine light. No error message. I cleaned and checked electrical connectors to sensors for correct voltage. I was checking for a bad ground. They checked ok. I checked fuel pressure which checked ok. I still need to check vacume pressure for leaks. Other then that what else can I check?
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Monday, November 9th, 2009 AT 9:59 AM

3 Replies

Tiny
MATHIASO
  • MEMBER
Hello!
What about the instument panel self test, when you ruen thekey in " start" do you see engine light, or other light coming on for seconds?
If you do not see any light, there may be engine light, but the light bulb burn out.
Have it diagnose anyway for pending code(s)
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Tuesday, November 10th, 2009 AT 6:20 AM
Tiny
SFCJDHERRERA
  • MEMBER
Yes, the engine check light comes when started and goes off as normal. I also re-checked for any error messages. There is no error messages. I am going check the Idle Air Control Motor next. Hopefully that will be the problem.
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Tuesday, November 10th, 2009 AT 8:31 AM
Tiny
MATHIASO
  • MEMBER
No-code driveability and emission problems are the ones everybody hates,
One of the first things you should check is loop status. The fuel system cannot deliver the proper fuel mixture if is stuck in open loop. If the engine fails to go into closed loop after it has warmed up or been driven, it may have a faulty coolant sensor or an open thermostat. The next logical step would be to look at the coolant sensor's output to see if it is reading normally or if its resistance changes as the engine warms up. No change in resistance or a reading that is out of range would tell you the coolant sensor is bad. To check the thermostat, you could use an infrared thermometer to measure coolant temperature at the thermostat outlet after the engine has warmed up. If low, the thermostat may be open, missing or the wrong temperature rating for the engine.
You can also look at short-term and long-term fuel trim to see if the engine is running rich or lean. If the system is going into closed loop, look at the TPS and MAP inputs to make sure they are changing when the throttle position changes.
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Tuesday, November 10th, 2009 AT 10:54 AM

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