1986 Oldsmobile Cutlass Car Stalling / Dying

Tiny
AARON5951
  • MEMBER
  • 1986 OLDSMOBILE CUTLASS
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 14,000 MILES
Hi there,

Have a 1986 Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera 4 cyl.

Just in the past 3 days, car has started stalling when I slow down at an intersection to make a stop. Car will sputter at low speed and then die. Car will also continue to stall out more frequently after the initial stall occurs, up to 3 times within a 3 or 4 mile distance.

Also seems as if it is about to do the same thing when I go down large dips and then immediately back up a hill.

Also occurs if I go down a hill and then up an incline that bears to the right.

The car will not stall until it has been driven for 15 miles or so, so cold cranking and short distance trips are not a problem.

Have replaced the catalytic converter to no avail. Have had fuel filter problems in the past.

Is this an IAC problem or perhaps my fuel pump?

Thanks in advance.
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Thursday, September 4th, 2008 AT 1:03 AM

4 Replies

Tiny
RASMATAZ
  • MEMBER
Check the fuel pressure if okay-start with the IACV then these sensors TPS/MAF/MAP to include checking the EGR valve.
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Thursday, September 4th, 2008 AT 1:32 AM
Tiny
AARON5951
  • MEMBER
So you don't think it is the fuel pump? I'll be sure to pass your suggestions and help on to the mechanic.

Thanks.

By the way,

How much (in estimates) would each of these sensors run?
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Thursday, September 4th, 2008 AT 1:38 AM
Tiny
RASMATAZ
  • MEMBER
Sir, The idle air control valve is on the throttle body-find and clean it, also the EGR valve and see what happens.

Disconnect the air intake ductwork from the throttle body.

Start the engine, then increase and hold the idle speed to 1,000 to 1,500 rpm.

Spray the throttle cleaner or engine cleaner into the throat of the throttle body, aiming for the idle air bypass port (usually located on the side or top of the throttle body opening). Give this area a good dose of cleaner (about 10 second's worth).

Turn the engine off to allow the cleaner to soak into the IAC passageway.

Wait about three minutes.

Restart the engine, rev and hold at 1,000 to 1,500 rpm, and repeat the cleaning process again.

Turn the engine off again, and reattach the air intake ductwork to the throttle body.

Start the engine and rev and hold to 1,500 to 2,000 rpm until no white smoke is coming out of the exhaust pipe.

If this fails to make any difference, you can remove the IAC valve from the throttle body and spray cleaner directly on the tip of the valve and/or into the ports in the throttle body. Let the cleaner soak awhile, repeat as needed, then reinstall the IAC valve, start the engine and run it at 1,500 to 2,000 rpm as before until no white smoke is seen in the exahust.

If the idle speed still surges after this, the IAC valve is defective and needs to be replaced.
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Thursday, September 4th, 2008 AT 1:44 AM
Tiny
AARON5951
  • MEMBER
Wanted to give a quick update to see if anything else might spring to mind.

I had my dad clean out the throttle body earlier today, and it did not help. The car stalled out approximately 9 times in a 20 mile stretch.

Something interesting, however.

I drove back home tonight around 12:30, let the car start and idle normally (it idles at high speed for a few moments before it automatically lowers the idle, ) drove home also with the custom radio I had put in the car (and I left the radio off this time, ) and you know what, the car did not die on me one time on the way back home.

What, if any difference would this make on diagnostics for the fact that a.) It died in the heat of the day with the radio on, and I had forced the engine to lower the idle upon startup by pressing the accelerator at first start, and b.) Driving it home late at night with the radio off and allowing the car to naturally lower its idle upon startup without touching the accelerator?

Note again the throttle body cleaning did not work instantly, but perhaps it took a few hours to clean it out?

I also should mention more previous problems the car has had

Car fan sensor went out a long time ago and fan would not kick on, so car would get hot while stopped in idle traffic. Had new fan sensor put on the car, the fan runs constantly now but car does not get hot anymore.

Engine still bogs down when coming up steep grades of any considerable distance. Feels like it is grinding.

Car has 140,000 miles on it. Around 100,000 miles, the timing slipped on it at one point immediately after I had turned the car off. Once I had attempted to turn the car back on (5 minutes later) it would turn but not start.

About 3 months ago I had a coil changed on the car for another problem where the car would turn, but not start. Coil solved the problem.

Starter has been replaced on the car twice.

Corroded battery terminals in the winter can lead to the car not wanting to start at all, so the wires have to be adjusted.

Not sure if any of this extra stuff helps, but just in case, thought I would throw it out there.

Fuel filter gets clogged on fairly frequent occasions.I notice this because the car hesitates and jerks when gas levels get to 1/4 of a tank or less.

Input is appreciated.

**2nd update**

Going to take the car to a mechanic in the morning and have him check the fuel pump, EGR valve and the IAC valves to see if that helps.

Appreciate all the help guys. :)

Wish me luck. Lol
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Friday, September 5th, 2008 AT 12:39 AM

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