1986 Nissan Maxima no spark

Tiny
TERRY RAYMOND
  • MEMBER
  • 1986 NISSAN MAXIMA
  • 6 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 158,000 MILES
I have a 1986 Nissan Maxima that will not start, it has no spark. I've replaced the coil and wire, crank angle sensor, ignition control module, ignition switch and checked all fuses. Still no spark. Any suggestions? Thanks Terry
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Wednesday, January 13th, 2010 AT 10:49 PM

6 Replies

Tiny
92 MAX
  • MEMBER
Hi Terry

remove the oil filler cap and have a assistant wind over the motor while you check you can see rotating parts inside, if not suspect the cam drive, I'm unsure if it's a belt or chain on your model.
If ok then take a meter and check for power on both sides of the coil then report back

Regards Don

New Zealand
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Wednesday, January 20th, 2010 AT 6:22 AM
Tiny
TERRY RAYMOND
  • MEMBER
Don thank for your response, I removed the filler cap but my vision is limited because of a tube that dosn't let me see the valves. The rotor does turn though. This motor has a timing belt, which I replaced around 10,000 miles ago. AS for the voltage, when the key is on I have battery voltage both before and after the coil, just no spark when turnning it over. Terry
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Saturday, January 30th, 2010 AT 1:51 PM
Tiny
92 MAX
  • MEMBER
Hi again Terry

I do know from personal experience the older niossan's like yours need a very good battery or the ignition doesnt work and yet the injectors still do so filling the engine up with fuel but no spark. So a very good test is your volt meter across the battery while cranking, needs to be at least 10.5v. I got caught out on this one ! As the starter may be a reduction type the cranking speed still appears fine, this problem was eventually resolved in the maxima with the 92

if this test is ok then next
connect your voltmeter test leads to each side of the coil while your assistant winds over the engine, a old anologue or needle type voltmeter is easier to see. The voltage should flucuate from zero (very briefly so may not get all the way to 0 on your meter) to near battery voltage so at cranking may be around 10-12v deopendant on battery condition. The change may be very quick so hard to notice, I have used a tail light bulb to see it successfully, one side of coil primary to each end of bulb filament. If you do see it, check for spark at the coil secondary or tower connection with a spare spark plug with the threads of the plug connected to the negative battery terminal, be carefull as secondary voltages can kill !

Let me know how you go.
Don
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Sunday, January 31st, 2010 AT 2:44 AM
Tiny
TERRY RAYMOND
  • MEMBER
Hello Don, The voltage is 10.1 when cranking over the engine. Thats with a new battery fully charged. As for the next test I'm looking for an analog meter. Thanks, Terry
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Saturday, February 6th, 2010 AT 5:47 PM
Tiny
92 MAX
  • MEMBER
Hi terry
If your unable to track one down another very easy option is any lo current led and a 1k resistor in series, if you want to get keen then add a diode in series also, say a 1 amp in4007 would be fine. You'll have to put the led around the correct way to make it conduct, total led curruent will be less than 15ma, so will be difficult to blow things up with this very good piece of test equipment.

Test coil is being switched by ignition module by putting it across your battery, once you have confirmed your led tester works, connect the end that illuminated the led on the battery plus to the coil plus, the other end to the other side of the coil. It will blink a very short blink, then keep this in a match box in your tool box as a very handy tester.

Don
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Sunday, February 7th, 2010 AT 5:14 AM
Tiny
TERRY RAYMOND
  • MEMBER
Hello Don, Sorry it's been a while but work is first. I did the last test, the volt meter dosn't go to 0 when turning over, it drops to around 10 volts and stays there as long as I keep turning it over. And thats before and after the coil. Any ideas? Thanks, Terry
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Friday, March 5th, 2010 AT 7:43 PM

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