1998 Nissan 240SX Plastic Timing Chain Guide

Tiny
TIGMAT
  • MEMBER
  • 1998 NISSAN 240SX
Engine Mechanical problem
1998 Nissan 240SX 4 cyl Automatic 87,600 miles

Hi! As I understand, my 1998 240SX SE has both plastic and metal timing chain guides. When getting a leak repaired, a 1 1/2" piece of plasic was found in my oil pan and I was told it was a timing chain guide and that they didn't know how much longer my car had, but they could fix for $2,400. Well after checking the internet, I find that the 240s have a well-document problem with their plastic guides breaking, but that on my model, I should also have a metal guide and that I can have whatever is left of the plastic guide removed will no ill-effect. I plan to have this done. My question is: I am hoping that this plastic guide is located under the valve cover gasket when removed? Also, I can email a pic of the part since I have it in my possession! I thank you for your speedy reply to help put my mind at ease!!!!


http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/260441_Broken_timing_guide_1.jpg

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Thursday, October 23rd, 2008 AT 2:24 PM

3 Replies

Tiny
ROLLINJ30
  • MEMBER
First off its not very hard to change these guides yourself. Its definetily not worth 2400 dollars. It is not located under the valvecover. You have to take off all the front covers including your water pump etc. I believe that the guide you broke is the lower guide. You have 2 timing chains, 2 guides, and 2 tensioners. Be sure not to bend the oil pan because the front cover has a skoop that goes into the oil pan so dont be alarmed when you cant take the front cover all the way off you have to work with what room you have. But if you just dont care about the money then having someone do it is probably your best bet.
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Wednesday, October 29th, 2008 AT 11:41 AM
Tiny
TIGMAT
  • MEMBER
Hi Rollinj30! I thank you for your advice! After MUCHO checking with auto shops and on the internet, I THINK I have decided to "wing" it and just drive the car since everyone/where I have checked says it should be making some kind of noise - which it is not. I was worried that the car might jump timing with it broken, but was told that unless I reved the engine unusually high, it should be just fine (still have tensioner arm in place) with the short distances I drive it. The auto shops I spoke with all said, "while we're in there, we might as well change out all the parts in the area", hence the high amounts. BUT, if you think I'm driving a ticking time-bomb, please let me know!
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Wednesday, October 29th, 2008 AT 12:57 PM
Tiny
ROLLINJ30
  • MEMBER
With half of a guide yea I would say so. I mean it may not be a problem for a while, but its definate that there will be a problem. If I was looking at the picture right it looks like it broke at the pivot point which is a major part well because thats where it mainly bolts up. If the rest is in there just chillin then jumping timing will be a very real instance. But your tensioners should hold it in place just pray they dont decide to lock up on you. They tend to do that at about 100,000 miles or so.
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Wednesday, October 29th, 2008 AT 1:03 PM

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