My radiator fan fuse keeps burning out

Tiny
CALVIN38HOWARD
  • MEMBER
  • 2003 FORD MUSTANG
  • 4.6L
  • V8
  • RWD
  • MANUAL
  • 100,000 MILES
My car started running hot today, I didn't really notice the problem and till my air conditioner started running hot air, so I lift the hood and noticed that my radiator fan fuse was blown, I replaced the fuse it started to run hot again, I look at the fuse box again, and it had blew out the new fuse is well, it didn't start running hot until I turn on the air conditioner if that helps with your diagnosis, please tell me its a easy fix
calvin
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Sunday, July 27th, 2014 AT 6:49 PM

5 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Unplug the radiator fan, then see if a new fuse blows. If you have two fans, one for the radiator and one for the AC condenser, start with the condenser fan. If the fuse no longer blows, suspect that fan motor. If you spin the fan by hand and it's tight, that's the definitive clue.
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Sunday, July 27th, 2014 AT 8:17 PM
Tiny
CALVIN38HOWARD
  • MEMBER
Im sure it has one fan, but I'll try what you say, thanks for the reply and I'll get back to you
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Sunday, July 27th, 2014 AT 8:33 PM
Tiny
CALVIN38HOWARD
  • MEMBER
I went outside to check and see if the fan to the radiator would spin freely while off, and it was locked, so does that mean the radiator fan is shot?
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Tuesday, July 29th, 2014 AT 11:28 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Yup. You need a new motor. Without getting real technical, you need three things to generate a current mechanically, meaning a generator. That is a coil of wire, a magnet, and movement between the two. Guess what? A motor is a coil of wire, a magnet, and when you apply a current through it you get movement. A spinning motor is in effect a small generator but it's nothing we can measure or work with. The issue is when a motor is spinning it GENERATES a back current that opposes the current running it. That's why motors draw a higher current to get started, and once they're up to speed, the current they generate offsets about one third of the current needed to get it started, therefore, on average, a motor draws about two thirds of its starting current to keep it running.

To say that a different way, when the motor is locked up, it doesn't develop that back current. The higher starting current is there constantly until the fuse blows.

That's way more than you need to know to fix the problem. Find a new motor at a parts store or a salvage yard and your troubles should be over.
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Tuesday, July 29th, 2014 AT 10:41 PM
Tiny
CALVIN38HOWARD
  • MEMBER
Thanks for the help, I'll through a new fan on this weekend
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Wednesday, July 30th, 2014 AT 4:30 AM

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