More starting issues

Tiny
ERIK.S
  • MEMBER
  • 1997 CHEVROLET LUMINA
  • 3.1L
  • 6 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 158,000 MILES
Still seem to be having the same issues, and developed a new one. I have changed the camshaft sensor, crankshaft sensor, coil packs, and ignition control module. I have had all the fuel issues tested and fuel is not the problem. The car has always ran and idled just fine when it would start, but now that I changed the ignition control module, when it idles it just kind of bumps/sputters/misfires and sounds like it is trying to die. Most of the time it will start up just fine, but when it does not start and just cranks I am not getting any spark from any cylinder. The rough idling is a new problem which it has never done before, but the no start is still the main problem. I did find that the PCV valve/hose is electrical taped and I can hear and feel air escaping. It obviously been like that for awhile so I do not know if that is causing the all of a sudden sputtering/missing it seemed to develop over night. I am kind of at a loss now so any ideas would be my joy appreciated.
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Monday, December 5th, 2016 AT 9:11 PM

5 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Do not waste your time looking for other things that might not even exist until you replace that hose. On every engine that uses a mass air flow sensor, which is almost all cars other than Chrysler products, you cannot have any air sneaking into the engine that does not go through that sensor. That includes loose hose clamps, cracks in the fresh air tube, or vacuum leaks, like that PCV hose is causing. When air sneaks in that does not go through the mass airflow sensor, it does not get measured, and the fuel to go with it is not included in the fuel metering calculations. That can cause anything from a mysterious diagnostic fault code for "running too lean" on a good-running engine, to stumbling on acceleration, to a crank / no-start.

For the no-spark issue, start by having the diagnostic fault codes read and recorded. If we are lucky, there will be one to indicate the circuit that needs to be diagnosed. The people at many auto parts stores will do that for you for free.
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Monday, December 5th, 2016 AT 10:16 PM
Tiny
ERIK.S
  • MEMBER
Last time I had the codes read, they came up with the crankshaft sensor, camshaft sensor, and faulty ignition control module. I replaced all three of those and it is doing the same thing. I will have the codes read again and see. It will start just fine most of the time but sometimes when I shut it off it will just crank and take twenty to thirty minutes for it to start again, and has no spark. As soon as it gets spark again it fires right up.
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Tuesday, December 6th, 2016 AT 9:55 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Be aware those fault codes never say to replace parts or that one is bad. They only indicate the circuit or system that needs further diagnosis, or the unacceptable operating condition. When a part is referenced in a fault code, that part is the cause of the code about half of the time. Wiring and connector problems account for about half of the fault codes.
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Wednesday, December 7th, 2016 AT 7:19 PM
Tiny
ERIK.S
  • MEMBER
I replaced the PCV valve and hose and any other vacuum hoses I could find. Still having issues, if not worse than before. So what reccomendations do you have? The ignition just cranking seems to have gotten worse and now it will die as I'm driving and it will just crank. I have to wait 10-15 minutes and it'll start right up but still runs rough. Do you think the cranking and no spark could have anything to do with the V.A.T.S key possibly going bad? I don't know if that is a possibility, just a thought. Like I said I'm just stumped at this point. To me it just seems something electrical, not fuel or anything. Thanks
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Thursday, December 8th, 2016 AT 3:02 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
The next step requires a scanner to view live data. That will show which sensor signals are showing up at the Engine Computer. Also recheck for spark, and check for injector pulses while the no-start is occurring. The easiest way to check injector pulses is with a "noid" light. Auto parts stores will have those, and some rent or borrow tools so you don't have to buy them.
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Friday, December 9th, 2016 AT 9:33 PM

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