1992 Mazda 929 will not run.

Tiny
PJBRUCHS
  • MEMBER
  • 1992 MAZDA 929
Last summer I was driving the interstate, 70mph, and my Mazda 929 just quit running. I checked the timing belts, they are fine. Unfortunately, since I cannot start it at all, I cannot diagnose any other systems. Such as the computer. This engine has approximately 129,000 miles on it. Was always well maintained. I have checked everything mechanically that I can; everything looks good. I really didn't want to go out and spend a couple hundred dollars on a computer to see if that was the problem.
Please advise,
Pat
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Monday, February 13th, 2006 AT 2:43 PM

5 Replies

Tiny
COSMO
  • MEMBER
Timing belts? Are you sure your not looking at the alt. P/s and a/c belts? HAve you had the timing belt changed? If you want ot know if the timing belt is still attached, remove the dist. Cap and crank the engine over, if the rotor doesn't turn you've got a t-belt problem. If it does turn you might have a dist. Problem.

Cosmo. Mazda tech
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Monday, February 13th, 2006 AT 6:38 PM
Tiny
PJBRUCHS
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I'll give it a shot. I actually had a repair person remove the DOHC covers to inspect the timing belts. He said they were ok. He also said it would cost a minimum of $2,000 to troubleshoot and repair whatever problem there is.
Thanks, again. Pat
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Monday, February 13th, 2006 AT 7:12 PM
Tiny
COSMO
  • MEMBER
Well there is a good chance that you have had a distributor failure.

Cosmo. Mazda Tech
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Tuesday, February 14th, 2006 AT 5:49 AM
Tiny
PJBRUCHS
  • MEMBER
Thanks,
I'll pick a distributor up today to check it out. Since it hasn't been started since last July, any thoughts on what I should do to minimize any startup friction to this dry engine?
Please advise,
Thanks,
Pat
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Tuesday, February 14th, 2006 AT 6:43 AM
Tiny
RPVIEIRA
  • MEMBER
All you need to do before cranking that dry motor is pull out each spark plug and put a few drops of oil into the hole. A teaspoon's worth should be plenty. This will lubricate your cylinder walls in the combustion chamber enough to minimize wear should there be any corosion on the cylinder walls. You will, of course, get a bit of blue smoke after starting, but it will quickly disipate.
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Thursday, April 6th, 2006 AT 5:54 PM

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