2000 Lexus LS 400 shudder

Tiny
RIVERMIKERAT
  • MEMBER

Jim and samslam, have you checked the axle bearings? Or the ring and pinion for alignment issues? Maybe a loose U-joint? Or a U-joint cap missing a needle bearing or two. Double check the rear shocks, leaf springs, etc. Make sure you aren't experiencing a tread sep issue, or a tire cupping issue.

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Wednesday, July 25th, 2012 AT 2:54 AM
Tiny
CTUBA
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Jim and samslam, did you guys every find out the problem with the vibration? I have the same issue. It gets worse when the weather gets colder.

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Monday, February 11th, 2013 AT 3:03 PM
Tiny
RIVERMIKERAT
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Ctuba, have you had it in a shop and had them pull ALL codes, both hard AND soft? Soft codes don't cause any of the lights to come on, but can reveal problems.

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Thursday, April 4th, 2013 AT 2:39 AM
Tiny
SMOKEY2705
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Hi Guys
I had a similar problem with an SC400 and it turned out to be the type of ATF that had been used in the transmissio. You must use Toyota Genuine ATF Type IV to ensure that the vibrations are removed. If you've used Dexron or similar you may need to change it a couple/few times to remove any trace of it.
Best of luck.

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Wednesday, April 10th, 2013 AT 9:40 AM
Tiny
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Thanks for the heads up there Smokey. Hopefully the guys having the problems will see your update.

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Saturday, November 9th, 2013 AT 3:53 PM
Tiny
SMOKEY2705
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I had a similar experience with an SC400 1994 model. After a lot of testing etc I found that the use of Dexron automatic transmission fluid was the culprit. Toyota/Lexus have specified a particular type of fluid and that only can be used. Try changing the fluid with Type IV from your local dealer, drive it for a while then change it again to try to get as much of the Dexron out of the system. It worked for me.

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Saturday, November 9th, 2013 AT 6:18 PM
Tiny
DRAGONEDDY
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A while back this was posted

"Try testing the shift solenoids, it can be done with an ohm meter, heres how:NO. 1, NO. 2, NO. 3 & NO. 4 SOLENOIDS 1. To check solenoid seals, remove suspect solenoid. Connect battery voltage to solenoid. Apply 71 psi (5 kg/cm 2 ) to solenoid with battery voltage connected. 2. With battery voltage applied, air should pass through solenoid. Disconnect voltage to solenoid. Ensure air does not pass through solenoid. Replace solenoid if defective. 3. Using ohmmeter, measure resistance between case and solenoid connector terminal. Resistance should be 11-15 ohms. Replace solenoid as necessary.

http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/62217_sols_1.jpg

SLN, SLT & SLU SOLENOID Raise and support vehicle. Remove transmission oil pan. Remove appropriate solenoid. See Fig. 1 . To check solenoid operation, connect positive battery voltage to solenoid terminal No. 1. Ensure an 8-10-watt bulb is placed in-line of positive lead. See Fig. 12 . Connect negative lead to terminal No. 2 and monitor valve's movement. Replace as necessary.

http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/62217_slu_1.jpg";

Can anyone tell me if they tested this? I dismantled two A560E transmissions and in both of them shift sol #4 does not have a spring to close the solenoid. This with no power connected it still allows flow.

Is this a fault? Or is the post Incorrect?

Thanks in advance

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Monday, April 25th, 2016 AT 2:57 PM
Tiny
RIVERMIKERAT
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I would say this is a fault Dragoneddy. That being the case, it could be the post was incorrect, although that would be quite rare as the information that was given came directly from Toyota/Lexus.

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Thursday, July 28th, 2016 AT 10:47 AM

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