2001 Land Rover Discovery 2 Loss of power v's coolent leak

Tiny
SEAN F
  • MEMBER
  • 2001 LAND ROVER DISCOVERY 2
  • 6 CYL
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 85,000 MILES
My question is: I was driving home (landrover discovery td5 2001) last night when I was very close to empty in fuel, I filled up as soon as I could, and soon afterwards ( about 15mins) I noticed a loss of power, I put this down to possible fuel block/ dirt etc, however a short time afterwards a noticed that my engine was running very hot, pulled over and then noticed that I was lossing coollent. I've limped home (towed) and notice my car is without all coolent now. Can I assume this was just a thermostat problem and not connected to this first issue of loss of power, or are they connected, what is the fault? How do I fix it please? Thanks.
Do you
have the same problem?
Yes
No
Thursday, April 23rd, 2009 AT 6:06 AM

3 Replies

Tiny
DAVE H
  • EXPERT
First you need to discover where the coolant leak is? A HOT engine will not run correctly and this will give driveability (sluggish) issues. If you are looseing coolant it is not a thermostat fault !
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Friday, April 24th, 2009 AT 3:12 AM
Tiny
SEAN F
  • MEMBER
No physical leak apears after refilling and observing for an hour, could it be that it came out from the overflow after a faulty sticking stat, this is a double valve stat on the td5, so I have doubts.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Friday, April 24th, 2009 AT 4:30 AM
Tiny
DAVE H
  • EXPERT
The thermostat would not cause coolant to overflow !

THERMOSTAT MONITORING SENSOR
Thermostat Monitoring Sensor
The thermostat monitoring sensor is located in the radiator, adjacent the bottom hose. See Fig. 20. The ECM compares the temperature measured by the thermostat monitoring sensor to the temperature measured by the ECT sensor. If the difference between the two readings is too great, the ECM determines the thermostat is stuck. In this case, the ECM registers a fault code in its memory.
The thermostat monitoring sensor works as a Negative Temperature Coefficient (NTC) sensor. As temperature rises, the resistance in the sensor decreases, as temperature decreases, the resistance in the sensor increases. With this information, the ECM is able to monitor the performance of the thermostat.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Saturday, April 25th, 2009 AT 7:00 AM

Please login or register to post a reply.

Recommended Guides