Is it possible for the ignition coil to melt to the wall of a spark plug

Tiny
ENILNODA
  • MEMBER
  • 2008 SUZUKI SX4
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 150,000 MILES
050320

About a year ago I got a new battery and had a tune up done. He was unable to change 1 spark plug. He says the ignition coil melted to the wall of the spark plug.

Since then the car has run okay. Yesterday it didn't start. No sound or anything when I turned the key. Some one gave me a jump. Until that moment there was no indication that the battery was getting weak.

I was then able to drive a few miles, park, turn it off, start it and drive another 1/2 mile and park.

I removed the battery so I could take it into the store for testing. They said it was good. I reinstalled it. I started the car. But then it sputters and shuts off immediately.

I found that by starting in neutral and sliding into gear fast, I could get moving. I drove about 1-1.5 miles. The car idled a bit rough at low speed and stops but didn't shut off until the last half of my trip. Then it shut off a few times at stops.

So I have 2 questions:
1. Can an ignition coil melt to the wall of a spark plug, and if so, would the car continue to start and run for a year?

2. Why would my car start sputtering and shutting off as if its not getting fuel when at rest after I removed and reinstalled the battery? It wasn't happening before I did that.

Side notes that may or may not have a bearing on these questions:

1. About 12 days ago my car overheated. I had to replace the radiator.

2. About 1 week ago someone hit my front end. He made a left turn into my car. Damage is bad, but I don't think the engine was damaged. Of course, I don't know. Mostly it looks like the bumper, headlight and hood damaged.(See pics)

Thank you for your help.
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Sunday, May 3rd, 2020 AT 4:39 PM

3 Replies

Tiny
KASEKENNY
  • EXPERT
The spark plug issue could happen and as long as the electrode inside the plug wire is making good contact with the spark plug it will operate just fine.

As for the issues that you are having today, they could definitely be related to the accident. When a front end collision occurs, all sorts of things can be pinched or damaged. Clearly we will need the car inspected by a body shop or insurance adjuster to get the full scope of damage. That is not something we will be very effective diagnosing via the internet because most likely we are not dealing with just a failed component.

Then add in the fact that the vehicle overheated and required a radiator, that brings in the possibility of engine damage like a warped head or head gasket issue.

I would start with checking the oil and make sure it is not milky. If it is then we have larger issues.

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/coolantantifreeze-in-the-engine-oil

Then we need to check for codes and go from there. If there are codes that can help with what direction we need to go.

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/checking-a-service-engine-soon-or-check-engine-light-on-or-flashing

Let me know what you find and we can go from there. Thanks
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Sunday, May 3rd, 2020 AT 6:01 PM
Tiny
ENILNODA
  • MEMBER
Thanks for your response. When you refer to "milky" looking oil, do you mean it will be sort of white in color? What does milky looking oil indicate?
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Monday, May 4th, 2020 AT 1:45 PM
Tiny
KASEKENNY
  • EXPERT
Correct. It can be anywhere from milk color to chocolate milk. I attached some examples. However, the more coolant that is in there, there whiter it will be.

Milky oil indicates the engine oil and coolant are mixing. This guides gives more detail:

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/coolantantifreeze-in-the-engine-oil

However, the most common cause is a blown head gasket. Let me know what other questions you have. Thanks
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Monday, May 4th, 2020 AT 7:16 PM

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