1999 Honda Accord Won't Crank

Tiny
ADAMSWTT
  • MEMBER
  • 1999 HONDA ACCORD
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 120,000 MILES
In the last two days (it's been cold in Houston) I've had trouble getting the car to crank. The dash lights come on, and when I turn the key to Start they dim slightly as usual. So far, after a few tries I can coax it to crank. It starts immediately, as usual. What's going bad? Is there a temporary fix, like spraying WD40 into the ignition keyhole? I need to fix it myself so please let me know how to remove any part that needs fixing.
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Friday, January 30th, 2009 AT 9:21 AM

3 Replies

Tiny
KHLOW2008
  • EXPERT
Hi adamswtt,

I believe it is the battery that is failing and I would suggest gettin it tested first. It can be done easily at your local Autozone outlets.

Let me know the results if it is otherwise.
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Saturday, February 7th, 2009 AT 6:58 AM
Tiny
ADAMSWTT
  • MEMBER
Follow up: I measured the battery voltage: 12.2 V after standing overnight, 14.3 when running. When I turn the key, I can hear the starter relay clack. I often have to do this twice to get the starter to crank, but when it cranks, it cranks as fast as ever, and the car starts right up. So if it isn't the battery, what else could be the problem?
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Tuesday, February 10th, 2009 AT 7:00 PM
Tiny
KHLOW2008
  • EXPERT
Yes, don't seem to be a battery problem. Other things to check would be :
1. Battery terminal connections. Remove, clean and retighten. Sometimes contamination would cause poor contacts resulting in insufficient current flow when required.
2. Battery grounding points. Check if the battery negative terminal to the transmission is securely tightened and check for frayed wires.
3. Check starter solenoid wire and cable connections. It could be the starter. Use a remote wire for the solenoid and apply battery voltage to test.
4. To test the discharge voltage, get someone to do the cranking and with voltmeter attached to battery terminals and when starter does not crank, read the voltage. If voltage drops below 10, the battery is failing. If the voltage remains above 10 volts, it is draining but not turning the starter, meaning the starter needs to be serviced. Carbons might be contaminated or running out.
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Wednesday, February 11th, 2009 AT 5:13 AM

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