Code P0333, rodents chewed the wiring

Tiny
JRYAN300
  • MEMBER
  • 2010 TOYOTA 4RUNNER
  • 6 CYL
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 165,000 MILES
Hey all, my vehicle listed above got hit by some rodents who feasted on my wiring. I originally had injector harness damage, fixed that but they apparently weren’t done eating. Now throwing the P0333 error. I can’t find anything on how to fix this and access the harness. Can you advise?
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Wednesday, March 9th, 2022 AT 8:22 AM

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Tiny
AL514
  • EXPERT
Hello, this is a code for the Bank 2 Knock Sensor (Knock Sensor 2 Circuit High Input-Bank 2).
Since it's a high voltage code, I think you're going to find more chewed up wires. You'll be able to find the sensor by the wiring colors.
Its location reads top of engine, so hopefully it shouldn't be too difficult to get to.

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-a-knock-sensor-works
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Wednesday, March 9th, 2022 AT 2:46 PM
Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
P0333 is a Knock sensor high input bank 2. Not a good thing on that engine as Toyota made the sensors very hard to access by bolting them to the block under the overhanging cylinder head. However, with other damage I suspect that they also snacked on the harness that runs between the two sensors and the rear of the engine underneath the intake and water lines in the engine tunnel. Getting to it isn't fun as it involves pulling the intake off and then the book calls for at least one cylinder head to get to the sensors and the harness. I have heard of altering this design and relocating the sensors and wiring to avoid this on vehicles just to keep them running a while longer. The basics are to find a spot on each side of the engine block where you can bolt the knock sensors, then using replacement pigtails for each to create new wiring outside the tunnel and back to the PCM harness. What I would suggest in this case is to go to https://www.alldata.com/diy-us/en and get a subscription for your vehicle and look at the wiring and repair path for the sensors. Warning, book time is 20+ hours.
For testing I would start at the harness connector and hope the short is outside that area of the engine, but as you already had injector harness issues, I'm suspecting they're also under the intake area in that tunnel and feasted there as well. However, if you find the harness connection where it comes out the rear of the engine you can at least test from there to see if the short is on that end. Hopefully you find that it's right there at the connector. The testing is simple but deceptive if done at the connector. You test across the two wires and if you see 125-250 K ohm the sensors and wiring are likely okay, except if one wire was shorted to ground or voltage it wouldn't be correct, for that you would need to check the wires with reference to power and ground.

If it were mine, I would likely get an inspection camera and snake it into that area and see if I could see damage. Then if it was there, I'd likely pull the intake off and see if I could clean out any mouse homes or food and see the sensors. Then if the wiring was chewed, I might use a pick to move them apart and slip some cut shrink tubing in there and coat it with liquid electrical tape just to keep the wires apart. Then clear the codes and see if they return.
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Wednesday, March 9th, 2022 AT 3:23 PM

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