1994 Ford Tempo removing wheel studs

Tiny
REDF4RR
  • MEMBER
  • 1994 FORD TEMPO
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 91,247 MILES
I am trying to replace the brake drums and the new ones dont have the wheel studs installed. I am wondering how to remove the old ones and the bearing housing?
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Saturday, January 31st, 2009 AT 2:22 PM

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Tiny
FIXITMR
  • MEMBER
Your question seems confusing. You remove old drums leaving bearings/studs alone. Replace with new drum. Now if old drums are froze to bearing/stud assembly then you beat them off!Try not to damage studs in process. Hit sharply around outer edge of drum. Usually after much beating they break loose. Once broke loose you may have to pry them off if shoes are too tight to drum. Which means your self adjusters did their job and kept your breaks snugged up!The reason it makes the drum hard to remove is over time this wears a groove which leaves a raised edge that the shoes have to get past to allow the drum to come off.I usually tap and pry with large screwdriver/crowbar alternating left and right side of drum. Another method is to go into adjuster hole(oblong rubber plug) on backside of drum/axle assembly and release the brakes by turning the adjuster back a few turns. Go to library and get manual for detials or buy the haynes manual from auto store. It's a pretty good manual on this car. Good luck
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Sunday, February 1st, 2009 AT 4:16 AM
Tiny
REDF4RR
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What is happening is I remove the old brake drum and the wheel studs and the hub come off with it. All that is still on the car is the spindle. I need to seperate the old wheel hub and the old brake drum, so I can install the old hub to the new brake. So, do I just beat it out or do I need a special tool to do this? Any help would be appreciated.
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Sunday, February 1st, 2009 AT 9:09 AM
Tiny
FIXITMR
  • MEMBER
Ok, I just am working on same type problem now. Here's what I discovered. Some one had replaced drums on car. They did not put them on right. Reason being that previous drums had been staked to hub by peening with a chisel/device the studs where they meet the drum. Below the threads the stud is slightly fatter and you can make stake marks and that's what was on them and when they put on the new drums they did not remove stake marks resulting in the drum holes being pushed up/bent on 1 side. So I reflatttened the holes with hammer and block of metal and then took my mini moto tool grinder and removed stake marks from studs. Now drum goes on without problem.I had no problem removing drum because holes were bent. It just fell off.

So I guess you removed grease cap and took nut off axle and that is how you removed drum with hub?Your drums must also be staked to studs. Look for the marks on studs right where studs meet drum. Also you might note that studs have extra at top with no threads. This so you can hit stud without damaging thread. You should use lead or special hammer. You can use regular hammer if your careful. You can support drum on edges so hub is free to drop out you can tap on studs by going around in sequence till hub drops out free. This may bend old drum but you dont care about that. Then you will have to remove stake marks from studs. You can use a file. Or like me a small electric grinder. Then just put hub and bearings back on then put new drum on. You can make a couple small stake marks yourself just to hold drum so it does not try to shift. Or you may not need to do so. Now you can adjust brake shoes to slightly drag on drum using adjuster hole in back of axle plate assembly.

They used to use the center hole for the drum alignment but they did tend to rust really tight and become very difficult to remove. So they must have changed to using studs for alignment. And to guarantee the drums were not accidentally misaligned by not properly seating around stud they decided to stake them.I dont like it. Makes the job more complicated.
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Sunday, February 1st, 2009 AT 8:56 PM

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