1990 Ford Taurus stalls

Tiny
FEEDDRIVE
  • MEMBER
  • 1990 FORD TAURUS
  • 6 CYL
  • FWD
  • MANUAL
  • 147,000 MILES
I have a 1990 sho and when I drive it more than 10 min the engine will shut off, no sputtering just shut off. What would cause that?
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Friday, April 18th, 2008 AT 4:31 PM

6 Replies

Tiny
BLACKOP555
  • EXPERT
Will it fire right back up?

Does it do it if the engine is hot, then started, then ran 10 miles?

Or does it die as soon as it gets warm from a cold engine?
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Friday, April 18th, 2008 AT 6:47 PM
Tiny
FEEDDRIVE
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From a cold start, once it gets warm it shuts off and won't restart until the engine cools back off. Now it won't even start at all. I'm really at a loss here. Do you have anything in mind that could fix it?
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Saturday, April 19th, 2008 AT 9:37 AM
Tiny
BLACKOP555
  • EXPERT
Sounds ignition related to me.

Check for bright blue spark at all cylinders, I wouldnt be surprised if you had none.

Use a spark plug tester and get back with me
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Sunday, April 20th, 2008 AT 7:50 AM
Tiny
FEEDDRIVE
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It has no spark. I replaced the Ignition module recently. Could it be the coil packs causing it? I can't think of anything else.

Thanks for all your help, man, I really appreciate it.
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Monday, April 21st, 2008 AT 8:31 AM
Tiny
BLACKOP555
  • EXPERT
So it has spark when it fires, but when it gets warm it stops firing?

It could very well be the coiil packs, or bad plug wires.

If its not those I would check the Crank shaft sensor.

Ill tell you how to use a hallogen light to test the crank shaft or coil packs bellow.
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Monday, April 21st, 2008 AT 7:49 PM
Tiny
BLACKOP555
  • EXPERT
There is no spark in one cylinder, try another. No spark in any cylinder would most likely indicate a failed DIS module or crankshaft position (CKP) sensor. Many engines that are equipped with electronic fuel injection also use the crankshaft position sensor signal to trigger the fuel injectors. So, if there is no spark and no injector activity, the problem is likely in the crank position sensor. No spark in only one cylinder or two cylinders that share a coil would tell you a coil has probably failed.

That would be the simplest way to think of it!

To test the coils

First, isolate the coil pack by disconnecting all the leads. Set the ohmmeter in the low range, and recalibrate if necessary. Connect the ohmmeter leads across the ignition coil primary terminals, and compare the primary resistance reading to specifications (typically less than 2 ohms). Then connect the ohmmeter leads across the coil secondary terminals and compare the secondary resistance reading to specifications (typically 6,000-30,000 ohms). If readings are outside the specified range, the coil is defective and needs to be replaced.

If measuring the secondary resistance of a DIS coil is difficult because of the coils location, try removing the wires from the spark plugs and measure secondary resistance through the plug wires rather than at the secondary terminals on the coils. Just remember to add in a maximum of 8,000 ohms of resistance per foot for the plug wires.

To test crank sensor and ignition module.

Connect a halogen headlamp to the spade terminals that mate the DIS module to the coils. A headlamp is recommended here because it puts more of a load on the module than a test lamp. If the headlamp flashes when the engine is cranked, the DIS module and crankshaft position sensor circuit are functioning. Therefore, the problem is in the coils
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Monday, April 21st, 2008 AT 7:58 PM

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