2001 Ford Mustang engine revs when clutch is depressed

Tiny
GIVENTOFLY
  • MEMBER
  • 2001 FORD MUSTANG
  • 6 CYL
  • 2WD
  • MANUAL
  • 100,000 MILES
I've found that while driving in traffic and the car is warm that the engine will rev up when I depress the clutch. This is more noticeable when I am coming to a complete stop, but also happens sometimes when I am shifting while driving. Also, while I am driving and take my foot off the gas, the car doesn't always seem to slow down as quickly as you would expect. Recently had the coolant flushed and after putting in some fuel additive the problem seemed to go away, but now it is back.
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Thursday, April 24th, 2008 AT 9:43 AM

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Tiny
SERVICE WRITER
  • EXPERT
Your taking the load off the engine, so it should happen to a certain extent.

What RPM is it rising to?

What Liter size motor?
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Thursday, April 24th, 2008 AT 9:51 AM
Tiny
GIVENTOFLY
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It's a 3.8L v6. Normal idle is about 750 rpm.

Its really noticeable in the parking garage (or traffic). If I am in first and slow down to maybe 1000 rpm when I depress the clutch to come to a stop it shoots up to 1800-2000 or a little more and stays there for a few seconds or until I put it back into gear. If I keep the clutch depressed sometimes it slowly drops.

When it happens while shifting on the highway it will just rev up 300 rpm or so but this doesn't last long since when I put it back into gear the rpms drop.
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Thursday, April 24th, 2008 AT 10:04 AM
Tiny
SERVICE WRITER
  • EXPERT
Okay. On the 3.8 motors they have had a intake gaskt leak that involves relacing the 6 intake seals, the larger perimerter intake gasket on the plenum and the 8 sleeved bolts.

If you can check the codes, you may find codes po171-po174 that regard a lean condition. IF so spray some carb cleaner around the plenum and listen for a idle change.

A faulty TPS may also be responsible, but their is no other procudeure I am aware of for testing other than replacing the TPS with a known good part.

Codes may be a good thing to start with.
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Thursday, April 24th, 2008 AT 6:57 PM
Tiny
GIVENTOFLY
  • MEMBER
Thanks Paul.

I will be sure to check this out this weekend. I am a weekend mechanic, novice to all of this. Is this repair going to be within my means? (Basically on a scale of 1-10 with 10 being really difficult, how would you rate this?)

Also, did you mean relacing or replacing?
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Friday, April 25th, 2008 AT 10:02 AM
Tiny
SERVICE WRITER
  • EXPERT
Replacing. Appearantly I skipped a key.

If this is the problem, replacing it isn't too bad at all. The big thing is the sequence and torque specs must adhered to.
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Friday, April 25th, 2008 AT 10:25 AM

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