1999 Dodge Truck Engine dies

Tiny
DLINDALL
  • MEMBER
  • 1999 DODGE TRUCK
  • V8
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 94,000 MILES
Engine dies takes anywhere from 5 to 10 minutes to a hour before it will restart. Replaced fuel pump took for test drive today it died three times took over a hour to restart one time took 15 minutes the third time 5 minutes. I can drive sometimes for up to a couple weeks before it acts up.
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Thursday, September 30th, 2010 AT 1:07 PM

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Tiny
DAVE H
  • EXPERT
Hello. Thanks for donation. Much appreciated

check for spark next time the car dies? Is the check engine light? Check for fault codes? We need more exact model details before we can assist further?

DISTRIBUTORLESS IGNITION SYSTEM (DIS)
Ram Pickup 8.0L
DIS eliminates mechanical ignition components that can wear out. PCM has complete ignition control and uses a coil pack, CMP sensor and CKP sensor to control ignition timing. CMP sensor reads slots in cam timing sprocket. PCM uses this information along with information from CKP sensor to determine if fuel injectors and ignition coils are properly sequenced for correct cylinders.
Basic timing is determined by CKP sensor position and is not adjustable. One complete engine revolution may be required for PCM to determine crankshaft position during cranking.
Molded ignition coils are used. Each coil fires 2 paired spark plugs at the same time. One cylinder is on compression stroke and other cylinder is on exhaust stroke.
HALL EFFECT IGNITION SYSTEM
Except Ram Pickup 8.0L
This system is equipped with a Hall Effect distributor. See Fig. 1. Shutter(s) attached to distributor shaft rotate through distributor Hall Effect switch, also referred to as a CMP sensor, which contains a distributor pick-up (a Hall Effect device and magnet). As shutter blade(s) pass through pick-up, magnetic field is interrupted and voltage is toggled between high and low. PCM uses this cylinder position data from CMP sensor, along with engine speed (RPM) and CKP sensor data, to control ignition timing and injector pulse width to maintain optimum driveability.
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Thursday, September 30th, 2010 AT 8:24 PM
Tiny
DLINDALL
  • MEMBER
The check engine light has never come on I have checked for fault codes found none. I haven't check for spark because I never have anything with me to check it when it dies I know that's dumb on my part. Their must not be any spark because it doesn't start until it sets for a while like a sensor is getting hot and when it cools then it will start. I have no idea what sensor might do this. The engine is a 360 I haven't had very much trouble with it tell now. I have change the oxygen sensors. Its like something is telling the computer to shut down. How do you check the ckp & cmp sensor could the computer be bad
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Thursday, September 30th, 2010 AT 9:21 PM
Tiny
DAVE H
  • EXPERT
Sorry for the delay in reply. I would test the sensors before condemning the PCM. Sometimes the CKP and CMP intermittent faults do not set codes

DTC P0320: NO CRANK REFERENCE SIGNAL AT PCM (GAS)
NOTE:For connector terminal identification, see CONNECTOR IDENTIFICATION. For circuit identification and wiring diagram, see RAM PICKUP wiring diagram in WIRING DIAGRAMS article.

NOTE:DTC P0320: NO CRANK REFERENCE SIGNAL AT PCM is monitored during engine cranking. DTC may be stored in Powertrain Control Module (PCM) when PCM senses no Crankshaft Position (CKP) sensor signal during engine cranking, and at least 3 Camshaft Position (CMP) sensor signals have occurred. Possible causes are: defective PCM, defective CKP sensor, defective connectors or defective wiring harness.

Turn ignition on, with engine off. Using scan tool, read current CKP count and attempt to start engine. If current CKP count changes while attempting to start engine, go to next step. If current CKP count does not change while attempting to start engine, go to step 4).
Start engine and allow it to idle. Wiggle wiring harness from CKP sensor to PCM. PCM is located in engine compartment. See PCM LOCATION table under SYSTEM DIAGNOSTICS. For CKP sensor location, see Fig. 42. If engine stalls while wiggling wiring harness, repair wiring harness as necessary where wiggling caused engine to stall. Perform TEST VER-2A. If engine does not stall while wiggling wiring harness, go to next step.
Fig. 42: Locating CKP Sensor (8.0L)
Courtesy of CHRYSLER CORP.
Turn ignition off. Visually inspect related connectors and wiring harness for damage. Repair connectors and wiring harness as necessary. Perform TEST VER-2A. If connectors and wiring harness are okay, test is complete.
Turn ignition off. Disconnect CKP sensor connector. See Fig. 42. Clean and/or repair connector as necessary. Turn ignition on, with engine off. Using a voltmeter, check voltage on CKP sensor connector, 5-volt supply circuit (Violet/White wire). If voltage is more than 4.5 volts, go to next step. If voltage is 4.5 volts or less, go to step 11).
Ensure ignition is off. Ensure CKP sensor connector is still disconnected. Using an ohmmeter, check resistance between ground and CKP sensor connector, sensor ground circuit (Black/Light Blue wire). If resistance is less than 5 ohms, go to next step. If resistance is 5 ohms or more, repair open sensor ground circuit. Perform TEST VER-2A.
Ensure ignition is off. Ensure CKP sensor connector is still disconnected. Visually inspect connector for corroded, damaged, pushed-out or miswired terminals. Repair connector as necessary. Perform TEST VER-2A. If connector is okay, go to next step.
Ensure ignition is off. Ensure CKP sensor connector is still disconnected. Disconnect PCM connectors. PCM is located in engine compartment. See PCM LOCATION table under SYSTEM DIAGNOSTICS. Clean and/or repair connectors as necessary. Using ohmmeter, check resistance of CKP signal circuit (Gray/Black wire) between CKP sensor and PCM. If resistance is less than 5 ohms, go to next step. If resistance is 5 ohms or more, repair open CKP signal circuit. Perform TEST VER-2A.
Ensure ignition is off. Ensure CKP sensor and PCM connectors are still disconnected. Using ohmmeter, check resistance between ground and PCM connector, CKP sensor signal circuit (Gray/Black wire). If resistance is less than 5 ohms, repair signal circuit for short to ground. Perform TEST VER-2A. If resistance is 5 ohms or more, go to next step.
Ensure ignition is off. Ensure CKP sensor and PCM connectors are still disconnected. Visually inspect connectors for corroded, damaged, pushed-out or miswired terminals. Repair connectors as necessary. Perform TEST VER-2A. If connectors are okay, go to next step.
At this time, CKP sensor is assumed to be defective. Replace CKP sensor. Perform TEST VER-2A.
Turn ignition off. Ensure CKP sensor connector is still disconnected. Visually inspect connector for corroded, damaged, pushed-out or miswired terminals. Repair connector as necessary. Perform TEST VER-2A. If connector is okay, go to next step.
Ensure ignition is off. Ensure CKP sensor connector is still disconnected. Disconnect PCM connectors. PCM is located in engine compartment. See PCM LOCATION table under SYSTEM DIAGNOSTICS. Clean and/or repair connectors as necessary. Using ohmmeter, check resistance of CKP 5-volt supply circuit (Violet/White wire) between CKP sensor and PCM. If resistance is less than 5 ohms, go to next step. If resistance is 5 ohms or more, repair open CKP 5-volt supply circuit. Perform TEST VER-2A.
Ensure ignition is off. Ensure CKP sensor and PCM connectors are still disconnected. Using ohmmeter, check resistance between ground and PCM connector, CKP sensor 5-volt supply circuit (Violet/White wire). If resistance is less than 5 ohms, repair CKP 5-volt supply circuit for short to ground. Perform TEST VER-2A. If resistance is 5 ohms or more, go to next step.
Ensure ignition is off. Ensure CKP sensor and PCM connectors are still disconnected. Visually inspect connectors for corroded, damaged, pushed-out or miswired terminals. Repair connectors as necessary. Perform TEST VER-2A. If connectors are okay, go to next step.
At this time, PCM is assumed to be defective. Replace PCM. Perform TEST VER-2A.

DTC P0340: NO CAM SIGNAL AT PCM (GASOLINE)
NOTE:For connector terminal identification, see CONNECTOR IDENTIFICATION. For circuit identification and wiring diagram, see RAM PICKUP wiring diagram in WIRING DIAGRAMS article.

NOTE:DTC P0340: NO CAM SIGNAL AT PCM is monitored with ignition on. DTC may be stored in Powertrain Control Module (PCM) when PCM senses 96 Crankshaft Position (CKP) sensor signals and no Camshaft Position (CMP) sensor signal. Possible causes are: no-start condition present, defective camshaft sprocket, defective CMP sensor, defective distributor or pulse ring, defective PCM, defective connectors or defective wiring harness.

On 8.0L engine, go to 16. On all other engines, turn ignition on, with engine off. Using scan tool, read DTCs. If DTC SPECIFIC GOOD TRIP COUNTER is displayed and displayed count is "0", go to next step. If DTC SPECIFIC GOOD TRIP COUNTER is not displayed or displayed count is not "0", go to 14.
Turn ignition off. Disconnect CMP sensor connector. See Fig. 43. Clean and/or repair connector as necessary. Turn ignition on, with engine off. Using a voltmeter, check voltage on CMP sensor connector, 5-volt supply circuit (Violet/White wire). If voltage is more than 4 volts, go to next step. If voltage is 4 volts or less, repair open 5-volt supply circuit. Perform TEST VER-5A.
Turn ignition off. Ensure CMP sensor connector is still disconnected. Using an ohmmeter, check resistance between ground and CMP sensor connector, sensor ground circuit (Black/Light Blue wire). If resistance is less than 5 ohms, go to next step. If resistance is 5 ohms or more, repair open sensor ground circuit. Perform TEST VER-5A.
Ensure ignition is off. Ensure CMP sensor connector is still disconnected. Connect one end of a jumper wire to CMP sensor connector, signal circuit (Tan/Yellow wire). Turn ignition on, with engine off. Using scan tool, monitor CMP count while tapping other end of jumper wire to CMP sensor connector, sensor ground circuit (Black/Light Blue wire). If CMP count changes, go to next step. If CMP count does not change, go to 8.
Turn ignition off. Ensure CMP sensor connector is still disconnected. Visually inspect connector for corroded, damaged, pushed-out or miswired terminals. Repair connector as necessary. Perform TEST VER-5A. If connector is okay, go to next step.
Ensure ignition is off. Remove distributor cap and rotor. Inspect pulse ring for damage or misalignment. Observe pulse ring while cranking engine. Ensure pulse ring rotates when engine is cranked. Repair or replace distributor and/or pulse ring as necessary. Perform TEST VER-5A. If pulse ring is okay, go to next step.
At this time, CMP sensor is assumed to be defective. Replace CMP sensor. Perform TEST VER-5A.
Turn ignition off. Ensure CMP sensor is still disconnected. Disconnect PCM connectors. PCM is located in engine compartment. See PCM LOCATION table under SYSTEM DIAGNOSTICS. Clean and/or repair connectors as necessary. Using ohmmeter, check resistance of CMP sensor connector, signal circuit (Tan/Yellow wire). If resistance is less than 5 ohms, repair signal circuit for short to 5-volt supply circuit (Violet/White wire). Perform TEST VER-5A. If resistance is 5 ohms or more, go to next step.
Ensure ignition is off. Ensure CMP and PCM connectors are still disconnected. Using ohmmeter, check resistance of CMP sensor connector, signal circuit (Tan/Yellow wire) between CMP sensor and PCM. If resistance is less than 5 ohms, go to next step. If resistance is 5 ohms or more, repair open signal circuit. Perform TEST VER-5A.
Ensure ignition is off. Ensure CMP and PCM connectors are still disconnected. Using ohmmeter, check resistance between ground and CMP sensor connector, signal circuit (Tan/Yellow wire). If resistance is less than 5 ohms, go to next step. If resistance is 5 ohms or more, repair signal circuit for short to ground. Perform TEST VER-5A.
Ensure ignition is off. Ensure CMP and PCM connectors are still disconnected. Using ohmmeter, check resistance between CMP connector, signal circuit (Tan/Yellow wire) and sensor ground circuit (Black/Light Blue wire). If resistance is less than 5 ohms, repair signal circuit for short to sensor ground circuit. Perform TEST VER-5A. If resistance is 5 ohms or more, go to next step.
Ensure ignition is off. Ensure CMP sensor connector is still disconnected. Visually inspect connector for corroded, damaged, pushed-out or miswired terminals. Repair connector as necessary. Perform TEST VER-5A. If connector is okay, go to next step.
At this time, PCM is assumed to be defective. Replace PCM. Perform TEST VER-5A.
Attempt to start engine. If engine starts, go to next step. If engine does not start, perform TEST NS-SEL: NO START SELECTION MENU
Ensure ignition is off. Visually inspect related connectors and wiring harness for damage. Repair connectors and wiring harness as necessary. Perform TEST VER-5A. If connectors and wiring harness are okay, test is complete.
Turn ignition on, with engine off. Using scan tool, read DTCs. If DTC SPECIFIC GOOD TRIP COUNTER is displayed and displayed count is "0", go to next step. If DTC SPECIFIC GOOD TRIP COUNTER is not displayed or displayed count is not "0", go to 29.
Turn ignition off. Disconnect CMP sensor connector. See Fig. 44. Clean and/or repair connector as necessary. Turn ignition on, with engine off. Using a voltmeter, check voltage on CMP sensor connector, 5-volt supply circuit (Violet/White wire). If voltage is more than 4 volts, go to next step. If voltage is 4 volts or less, repair open 5-volt supply circuit. Perform TEST VER-5A.
Turn ignition off. Ensure CMP sensor connector is still disconnected. Using an ohmmeter, check resistance between ground and CMP sensor connector, sensor ground circuit (Black/Light Blue wire). If resistance is less than 5 ohms, go to next step. If resistance is 5 ohms or more, repair open sensor ground circuit. Perform TEST VER-5A.
Ensure ignition is off. Ensure CMP sensor connector is still disconnected. Connect one end of a jumper wire to CMP sensor connector, signal circuit (Tan/Yellow wire). Turn ignition on, with engine off. Using scan tool, monitor CMP count while tapping other end of jumper wire to CMP sensor connector, sensor ground circuit (Black/Light Blue wire). If CMP count changes, go to next step. If CMP count does not change, go to 23.
Turn ignition off. Ensure CMP sensor connector is still disconnected. Visually inspect connector for corroded, damaged, pushed-out or miswired terminals. Repair connector as necessary. Perform TEST VER-5A. If connector is okay, go to next step.
Ensure ignition is off. Remove CMP sensor. Inspect camshaft sprocket for damage. Repair or replace camshaft sprocket as necessary. Perform TEST VER-5A. If camshaft sprocket is okay, go to next step.
At this time, CMP sensor is assumed to be defective. Replace CMP sensor. Perform TEST VER-5A.
Turn ignition off. Ensure CMP sensor is still disconnected. Disconnect PCM connectors. PCM is located in engine compartment. See PCM LOCATION table under SYSTEM DIAGNOSTICS. Clean and/or repair connectors as necessary. Using ohmmeter, check resistance of CMP sensor connector, signal circuit (Tan/Yellow wire). If resistance is less than 5 ohms, repair signal circuit for short to 5-volt supply circuit (Violet/White wire). Perform TEST VER-5A. If resistance is 5 ohms or more, go to next step.
Ensure ignition is off. Ensure CMP and PCM connectors are still disconnected. Using ohmmeter, check resistance of CMP sensor connector, signal circuit (Tan/Yellow wire) between CMP sensor and PCM. If resistance is less than 5 ohms, go to next step. If resistance is 5 ohms or more, repair open signal circuit. Perform TEST VER-5A.
Ensure ignition is off. Ensure CMP and PCM connectors are still disconnected. Using ohmmeter, check resistance between ground and CMP sensor connector, signal circuit (Tan/Yellow wire). If resistance is less than 5 ohms, go to next step. If resistance is 5 ohms or more, repair signal circuit for short to ground. Perform TEST VER-5A.
Ensure ignition is off. Ensure CMP and PCM connectors are still disconnected. Using ohmmeter, check resistance between CMP connector, signal circuit (Tan/Yellow wire) and sensor ground circuit (Black/Light Blue wire). If resistance is less than 5 ohms, repair signal circuit for short to sensor ground circuit. Perform TEST VER-5A. If resistance is 5 ohms or more, go to next step.
Ensure ignition is off. Ensure CMP sensor connector is still disconnected. Visually: inspect connector for corroded, damaged, pushed-out or miswired terminals. Repair connector as necessary. Perform TEST VER-5A. If connector is okay, go to next step.
At this time, PCM is assumed to be defective. Replace PCM. Perform TEST VER-5A.
Attempt to start engine. If engine starts, go to next step. If engine does not start, perform TEST NS-SEL: NO START SELECTION MENU.
Ensure ignition is off. Visually inspect related connectors and wiring harness for, damage. Repair connectors and wiring harness as necessary. Perform TEST VER-5A. If connectors and wiring harness are okay, test is complete.
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Tuesday, October 5th, 2010 AT 7:21 PM

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