1995 Dodge Truck Plugged Converter

Tiny
KC8PNY
  • MEMBER
  • 1995 DODGE TRUCK
  • 6 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 121,254 MILES
I have a 1995 Dodge Pickup truck. About 3 weeks ago I was driving and then all of a sudden the truck like lost power and I pulled over to the side of the road, while sitting along the side of the road, The truck would run but it ran very badly, I would press the accelerater pedal and it would like die out. I had the vehicle towed home and it ran fine when it was dropped off. I then drove the truck a couple days later and it went abut 12 miles and then it did the same thing. I ahve talked to several people they are all giving me diffrent answers on it. 2 people said it is the Catyltic Converter being clogged and when it heats up its expanding, Then contracts when it cools, Another person is saying once its clogged its always clogged and that my check engine light would be on but my check engine light is not on at all nor does it come on. Could hti sin fact be a clogged converter?
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Thursday, March 19th, 2009 AT 4:52 AM

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Tiny
RASMATAZ
  • MEMBER
You can have the following done below to test for a clogged catalytic converter

The easiest test for converter plugging is done with a vacuum gauge. Connect the gauge to a source of intake vacuum on the intake manifold, carburetor or throttle body. Note the reading at idle, then raise and hold engine speed at 2,500. The needle will drop when you first open the throttle, but should then rise and stabilize. If the vacuum reading starts to drop, pressure may be backing up in the exhaust system.

You can also try to measure backpressure directly. If your engine has air injection, disconnect the check valve from the distribution manifold, and connect a low pressure gauge. Or, remove the oxygen sensor and take your reading at its hole in the manifold or headpipe. Refer to the backpressure specs for the application. Generally speaking, more than 1.25 psi of backpressure at idle, or more than 3 psi at 2,000 rpm tells you there's an exhaust restriction.

If there appears to be an exhaust restriction, disconnect the exhaust pipe just aft of the converter to relieve pressure and recheck the readings. CAUTION: The pipes will be hot so wait awhile for things to cool down. If vacuum goes up and/or backpressure drops, the problem isn't not a plugged converter but a plugged muffler or collapsed pipe. If there's little or no change in readings, the converter is plugged.

Or get a 5 gas analysis done
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Thursday, March 19th, 2009 AT 5:07 AM
Tiny
COONHILL2007
  • MEMBER
Your converter could still be plugged eventhough your check engine light is not on. Your check engine light wil not come on unless you have an o2 sensor after the converter.
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Thursday, June 11th, 2009 AT 1:50 PM

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