1992 Dodge Shadow Resistance and Ohms Law

Tiny
SUNSHINE 03
  • MEMBER
  • 1992 DODGE SHADOW
1992 Dodge Shadow

Hi Everyone
I was once told that a common training tool for exposing electricians to resistance; was a large bulb in series with a small bulb. I believe it was on a 12 volt system and the bottom line is; that no matter what - the small bulb was the only one that worked. And another example would be; 6 light bulbs (2 ohms apiece) in series on a 12 volt circuit - resulting in none of the bulbs illuminating properly. Is anyone aware of these exercises and the resistances used in proportion to volts and amps?
I really appreciate your time and any ideas.
Thanks
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Thursday, August 20th, 2009 AT 10:04 PM

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Tiny
RASMATAZ
  • MEMBER
Hmmmm.... Ohms law Its E over IXR

The more resistance in a circuit the less power and vice versus

E
_______
I X R

Ohm's Law defines the relationships between (P) power, (E) voltage, (I) current, and (R) resistance. One ohm is the resistance value through which one volt will maintain a current of one ampere.

( I ) Current is what flows on a wire or conductor like water flowing down a river. Current flows from negative to positive on the surface of a conductor. Current is measured in (A) amperes or amps.

( E ) Voltage is the difference in electrical potential between two points in a circuit. It's the push or pressure behind current flow through a circuit, and is measured in (V) volts.

( R ) Resistance determines how much current will flow through a component. Resistors are used to control voltage and current levels. A very high resistance allows a small amount of current to flow. A very low resistance allows a large amount of current to flow. Resistance is measured in ohms.

( P ) Power is the amount of current times the voltage level at a given point measured in wattage or watts.


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Thursday, August 20th, 2009 AT 11:15 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
E = I x R
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Monday, September 7th, 2009 AT 3:54 AM

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