2005 Dodge Ram Drive by Wire throttle

Tiny
OVC70CAM
  • MEMBER
  • 2005 DODGE RAM
  • V8
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 37,000 MILES
To describe what happened; (25 degree overnight low temp Little Rock, AR) My wife went out today and started the truck (just turned the key, no pumping the throttle, I think I've cured her of that) it started normally and idled just fine, she did not notice any warning lights in the dash, but then again she wasn’t looking for any. She came back into the house to let it warm up, 10 to 15 minutes, when she went back out to leave she noticed the erratic idle and when she got back in the cab noticed the red “lightning bolt" alarm at the lower right of the dash display She put it in reverse and it would move, but not forward in drive. About that time I got back from the gas station in the Chevelle and tried the truck again I got it to move forward and back, but could not get it over 1900 RPM at full throttle. I took it around the block (almost a real bad move with the hills) and barley got it back into the driveway. It still starts idles and moves slowly (no check engine light, and after I did the "key thing while pressing the trip meter switch" no error codes [ 00 00). I read on some of the other forums about the throttle sensor on the foot pedal not sending a signal, but the fact that the it still responds to pedal position makes me think that's still working and the problem is on the other end by the TB? I could not find an answer to whether there was a relay in the black box next to the battery that controlled it. I don’t think the truck will run fast enough to get to a dealer, so I need to try and fix it here if I can figure out what to change. Any thoughts, and maybe a few tips on how to get to it without tearing anything up.
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Saturday, January 2nd, 2010 AT 6:50 PM

2 Replies

Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
WIthout any trouble codes, it becomes a guessing game. It could be the throttle position sensor, but that doesn't explaine the trans problem. Since no codes have been stored, I would suggest checking fuel pump pressure. That is a good place to start. Here is a how to:

http://www.2carpros.com/how_to/how_to_check_fuel_pressure.htm

Let me know what you find.

Joe
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Saturday, January 9th, 2010 AT 12:14 AM
Tiny
OVC70CAM
  • MEMBER
I'm not sure this is the way to get back to Jacobandnickolas, but here goes.
You may have heard the saying "can't see the forest for the trees" well, I'm one of those car guys that always looks for the "worst" case when trouble shooting a problem. I've pretty much been a Chevy man and my other vehicles are a 1970 Camaro and a 1972 Chevelle, now mind you I'm not making an excuse for my lack of observation, but on older cars insulation material pretty much looks like fuzzy gray or brown insulation. On the Dodge truck the firewall insulation is coated in a black jacket so when I glanced at the firewall while pulling off the air-box to clean the throttle body I did not reason that ALL the black plactic had been eaten off and the nice brown evenly trimmed raw insulation was all that was left. I even reasoned that the neatly piled raw insulation form fitted to the back of the air-box and up against the side of the throttle body was put there by the factory to help reduce the intake noise that everyone mentions is so predominent when an aftermarket cold-air package is installed. After cleaning the throttle body I CARFULLY put the air-box back in place making sure I did not disturb all that insulation material. Now for the worst part, my wife happened by while I was under the hood and asked what that pile of acorns was doing on the intake manifold, to which I replied "hey we park under an oak tree". After I finally had the truck towed back to the dealer he gave us a call to explain that we had "rodent damage" and the wiring harness had been chewed in several places. They pulled the entire harness, repaired the breaks, and then thoughly checked every wire for continuity and resistance (so they could guarantee the job) cleaned up the insulation mess, and re-installed the harness. Lucky for me none of the connected components were damaged, $291.00 + $80.00 towing later I was back to driving the truck. The next day the wife looked under the hood before she left and ran a little three inch mouse from one side of the engine to the other before jumping to the ground. I guess it was ready to take up right where it left off. We now have (5) traps set, two under the hood, two on top of the front tires, and a larger (rat/squirrel) wire trap under the oak tree, so far no mice or rats, but one squirrel in the wire trap. I suppose the moral to all this is to LOOK! At everything first before just diving in to try and find all the hard to reach expensive stuff to fix, sometimes the cure is just too obvious to see. As for the answer I recieved, well first the technician needs an ACCURATE description of the problem, and that's up to us (heh, heh) CAR GUYS!
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Saturday, January 9th, 2010 AT 12:14 PM

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