99 Dodge Dakota

Tiny
DANTE50
  • MEMBER
  • 1999 DODGE DAKOTA
I just had an interestig problem with my dakota, I was heading to work, I get off the expressway and notice an anti-freeze odor and see smoke coming from under the hood. I go to the gas station and lift the hood to find anti-freeze all over underneath and the radiator is empty. It's dark so I can not tell exactly what or where this came from. I call my brother-in-law who is a body technician but knows alot abotu cars, he thinks my thermostat may not have opened up and caused a hoseto blow, my dad thinks it may be a hose, or the water pump. Me I will know more in the morning, but until then I am trying to find other thoughts and trying to find repair information as to where my water pump is and how hard it is to replace in case that is the problem. Other than that does any one have any other thoughts that may have caused this to do this, or was it just a bad hose that blew?
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Monday, January 23rd, 2006 AT 11:20 PM

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Tiny
DOUGLAS WARREN
  • MEMBER
I would put water back in and check for any obvious leaks, you should see one right away. If it is a hose buy one and replace it your self. If it is the water pump and your mechanically inclined here is procedures for a 90 dakota and i'm sure it might be similar. If it is a water pump and you choose to have a mechanic do it expect to pay around $300.
Pretty generic steps but I hope it helps
Drain coolent if any remains, if so dispose of properly, remove belt, disconect hoses on water pump, remove fan cover, remove water pump. Take fan off pump, put on new pump, seal gasket, install pump. Replace items in order reversed order you removed them. The water pump should be located on the very front of the engine and usually has three or four bolts holding it on. Follow your water hose from the radiator one should go to the thermistat and the other to the water pump. I havent worked on a Dakota but most water pumps are installed similar on most engines. Good luck
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Tuesday, January 24th, 2006 AT 1:09 AM
Tiny
DOUGLAS WARREN
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Here is good site that also has good info on dakotas you might want to check it out.
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Tuesday, January 24th, 2006 AT 1:16 AM
Tiny
DANTE50
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I will do that first thing in the morning when I can see better obviously, I just hope it doesn't turn into a major job, I maybe mechanically inclined but I have limited funds and time, with working nights and going to school in the day. I appreciate your advice and assistance it at least gives me an idea.

Thanks
Dante
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Tuesday, January 24th, 2006 AT 1:16 AM
Tiny
DANTE50
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It sucks to because it is the Water Pump but I have yet been able to find anything (free) on how to replace the water pump, I maybe mechanically inclined but I am not a mechanic.

Dante
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Tuesday, January 24th, 2006 AT 12:16 PM
Tiny
DOUGLAS WARREN
  • MEMBER
Dante;
I dont know if you had any luck finding any help. I've done some searching and have found some things that might be of interest to you. From what I've read sometimes the fan can be a real bummer getting off the pump. Here is a few things and a site you may want to look at to get a better insight. Good luck, I would say expect to take 3 -5 hours depending on what problems you run into.
This is for a 98 Durango but it should be similar.

Just thought I would post what so far has been the main sticking point to changing the water pump in my wifes 98 Durango. Evidently there are two types of hubs on the water pump for this particular year. The factory service manual states to use a screw driver around the hub bolts to keep the hub from rotating while you try to undo the 36mm nut connecting the fan assembly to the hub.

Well, naturally, mine has a pressed on hub. No bolts to pin a screw driver to! No matter how much I tried to hold that hub, - no way. I consulted with the local Dodge service department head who insisted they were all bolt on hubs, in any case, he said to keep the belt on to provide tension, put the 36mm wrench (longer the better) on the nut, and whack it with a hammer.

With the belt back on the tension was still not enough. Then I remembered that somewhere in my stuff I had an old fashioned pully spreader tool used to properly put tension on the old style auto belts.

I attached the spreader between the tensioner and the crankshaft hub, made it as tight as I could with my hand, and gave the wrench two moderate whacks.

Basically, the only special tool you need to do the job is a big adjustable wrench (to get the fan off). You'll need the pump, the small aluminum tube that more likely than not won't come out of your old water pump, and it would be a good idea to replace the hoses while its all torn down.

Honestly, I had never done it before and it only took me an hour or two.

You will need a second set of hands for a minute when getting the fan off (seemed safer to me than wedging something in the blades to break the nut free and tighten it back down).

But, the first thing I would do is go down to your local auto parts store and pick up a shop manual. Mine was a Haynes, and it really helps to know what order stuff SHOULD come off, exactly which screws and bolts are located where (saves tons of time), etc etc.
Good luck
Doug
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Tuesday, January 24th, 2006 AT 7:52 PM
Tiny
DOUGLAS WARREN
  • MEMBER
Dante;
So what did you do to fix your truck? Did you do the work yourself or take it in? Just curious on what happened.
Doug
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Thursday, January 26th, 2006 AT 10:24 PM

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