1996 Dodge Caravan van will not start

Tiny
TFORD6
  • MEMBER
  • 1996 DODGE CARAVAN
  • 6 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 170,332 MILES
My 96 caravan has had multiple repairs done on it in the last 3 months. The problem is the check engine light comes on and flashes then the van backfires and dies and will not start. I have a tune up done on it, exhaust repair speed sensor on transmission, a new computer crankshaft postion sensor fuel pump module done. The mechanic has given up hope and wanting to stop working on it because he can't figure out what is wrong with it.
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Thursday, May 7th, 2009 AT 1:58 PM

8 Replies

Tiny
ZACKMAN
  • MEMBER
Sounds like the catalytic converter is plugged up. Get your PCM scanned and post the code numbers here.
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Sunday, May 10th, 2009 AT 3:18 AM
Tiny
TFORD6
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The catalyic converter was supposed to have been cleaned out so it is just open muffler was replaced. In case any parts fell and jammed in it. Can not get the codes because it was towed home to my house 2 days ago and will not run.
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Sunday, May 10th, 2009 AT 12:45 PM
Tiny
ZACKMAN
  • MEMBER
Do this. Insert the key into the ignition and cycle the key to ON-OFF-ON-OFF-ON within 5 seconds, but not too fast either. This will set the PCM into diagnostic mode. Locate your odometer LCD display, and jot down the codes that being displayed, and post what you find out.

On a side note: You can't "clean" catalytic converter. I am not sure what was done, but if they have removed the internal parts of the cat, it will not work properly.
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Sunday, May 10th, 2009 AT 1:08 PM
Tiny
TFORD6
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When we did this the service engine light was blinking if that is what you meant we counted them and go this 12242255

side note: I drove my van to his shop and had to tow it back!
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Sunday, May 10th, 2009 AT 2:16 PM
Tiny
ZACKMAN
  • MEMBER
That works too. Your codes are 12, 24, 22 and 55.

12. Battery has been disconnected for the past 50 cycles. Nothing there.

24. Throttle position sensor voltage high.
22. Engine coolant temperature sensor voltage too high.

55. End of test.

Give me the engine size for proper diagnostic. 3.0, 3.3, 3.8. Gas, CNG, Flex.
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Sunday, May 10th, 2009 AT 2:33 PM
Tiny
TFORD6
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Its a 3.3 ( 6 cyclinder)
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Sunday, May 10th, 2009 AT 3:03 PM
Tiny
ZACKMAN
  • MEMBER
TEST TC-27A - THROTTLE POSITION SENSOR VOLTAGE HIGH
1. Read throttle position sensor voltage. If voltage is more than 4.5 volts, go to step 6). If voltage is 4.5 volts or less, go to next step.
2. While monitoring throttle position sensor voltage, slowly open and close the throttle. If voltage does not change smoothly, replace throttle position sensor. If voltage changes smoothly, go to next step.
3. With throttle at closed position, wiggle wiring harness and connector going to throttle position sensor on throttle body while monitoring the voltage. If voltage changes while moving wiring harness, repair wiring harness or connector. If voltage does not change while moving wiring harness, go to next step.
4. Conditions required to set DTC are not present at this time. DTC may be stored in Powertrain Control Module (PCM) if throttle position sensor voltage at PCM terminal No. 35 is more than 4.5 volts. Possible causes are: sensor signal circuit open, defective throttle position sensor, sensor ground circuit open, defective PCM, defective connector terminals or wiring. Go to next step.
5. Check for defective wiring/connection at throttle position sensor and PCM. The PCM is located between driver's side front fender and power distribution center, near battery. If defective wiring/ connections exist, repair as necessary. If no defective wiring/connections exist, see INACTIVE TROUBLE CODE CONDITION.
6. Disconnect connector at throttle position sensor on throttle body. Install jumper wire between Orange/Dark Blue wire and Black/Light Blue wire on connector for throttle position sensor. Using scan tool, read throttle position sensor voltage.
7. If scan tool displays NO RESPONSE, repair Orange/Dark Blue wire for a short to the Violet/White wire. If scan tool displays a voltage of less than one volt, replace throttle position sensor. If scan tool displays a voltage of one volt or more, go to next step.
8. Remove jumper wire. Reconnect jumper wire between Orange/Dark Blue wire on connector for throttle position sensor and engine ground. Using scan tool, read throttle position sensor voltage.
9. If voltage is less than one volt, repair open circuit in Black/Light Blue wire (sensor ground). If voltage is one volt or more, go to next step.
10. Turn ignition off. Disconnect connectors from Powertrain Control Module (PCM). The PCM is located between driver's side front fender and power distribution center, near battery.
11. Using external ohmmeter, check resistance between Orange/Dark Blue on connector for throttle position sensor and PCM connector terminal No. 35 (Orange/Dark Blue wire). If resistance is less than 5 ohms, replace PCM. If resistance is 5 ohms or more, repair open circuit in Orange/Dark Blue wire between PCM and throttle position sensor.

TEST TC-31A - ENGINE COOLANT TEMP SENSOR VOLTAGE TOO HIGH
1. Using scan tool, read ECT voltage. If ECT voltage is more than 4.5 volts, go to step 7). If ECT voltage is 4.5 volts or less, go to next step.
2. Wiggle wiring harness and connector going to engine coolant temperature sensor while monitoring ECT voltage. Engine coolant temperature sensor is located near thermostat housing and contains a Black/Light Blue wire and a Tan/Black wire in the connector.
3. If ECT voltage changes while moving wiring harness, repair wiring harness or connector as necessary. If ECT voltage does not change while moving wiring harness, go to next step.
4. Conditions required to set DTC are not present at this time. DTC may be stored in Powertrain Control Module (PCM) if ECT voltage at PCM terminal No. 26 is more than 4.9 volts for more than 3 seconds. Possible causes are: sensor signal circuit open, sensor internally open, sensor ground circuit open, defective PCM, defective connector terminals or wiring. Go to next step.
5. Check for defective wiring or connections at engine coolant temperature sensor and PCM. The PCM is located between driver's side front fender and power distribution center, near battery.
6. If defective wiring or connections exist, repair as necessary. If no possible causes are found, see INACTIVE TROUBLE CODE CONDITION.
7. Disconnect connector at engine coolant temperature sensor. Engine coolant temperature sensor is located near thermostat housing and contains a Black/Light Blue wire and a Tan/Black wire in the connector.
8. Connect jumper wire between Black/Light Blue wire and Tan/Black wire in the connector for engine coolant temperature sensor. Using scan tool, read ECT voltage.
9. If ECT voltage is less than one volt, replace engine coolant temperature sensor. If ECT voltage is one volt or more, go to next step.
10. Remove jumper wire from connector. Reconnect jumper wire between Tan/Black wire in the connector for engine coolant temperature sensor and engine ground. Using scan tool, read engine coolant temperature sensor (ECT) voltage.
11. If ECT voltage is less than one volt, repair open circuit in Black/Light Blue wire (sensor ground). If ECT voltage is one volt or more, go to next step.
12. Turn ignition off. Disconnect connectors from Powertrain Control Module (PCM). The PCM is located between driver's side front fender and power distribution center, near battery.
13. Using external ohmmeter, check resistance between Tan/Black wire on connector for engine coolant temperature sensor and PCM connector terminal No. 26 (Tan/Black wire). If resistance is less than 5 ohms, replace PCM. If resistance is 5 ohms or more, repair open circuit in Tan/Black wire between PCM and engine coolant temperature sensor.

***My initial thought was faulty PCM, but you already have a new one, so that can't be it. So you need to get access to a scan tool for proper check engine light codes, instead of the generic ones that we have now. CSK/O'Reilly has a loaner scanner that you can borrow for a deposit.***
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Sunday, May 10th, 2009 AT 3:47 PM
Tiny
TFORD6
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Thanks, I 'll have to try to fix that. But right now I have to fix all the pieces the mechanic did not put back in they are between my seats.
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Sunday, May 10th, 2009 AT 3:57 PM

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