2004 Chrysler Sebring Leak and repair.

Tiny
JBZIP64J
  • MEMBER
  • 2004 CHRYSLER SEBRING
  • 6 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 137,000 MILES
Hello.I have a problem that has baffled me more than any other.2004 Sebring 2.7L V6. Replaced the water pump less than a year ago. Just replaced the thermostat and cooling sensor atop the motor. Still overheats, heater doesn't blow hot at all, even when engine temp runs high. Water leaking from primary weep hole next to thermostat housing. Hard to believe the water pump is out again. The car was givin to me by my Parents and the Mechanic(family friend.37 years bustin a wrench)that changed the water pump doesn't live here anymore. I can't figure out what else it could be. Tried to fill system with coolant without engine running and when I leave the rad cap off coolant leaks from underneath. Put rad cap back on and leak stops. Same with bleeder nipple on cooling sensor atop motor. Open bleeder it leaks from underneath. Close bleeder. Leak stops. Gravity issue I'm guessing! I know changing this particular water pump isn't an easy or time friendly job.I know my way around an engine. Grew up with tools in hand. I'm a STEP-BY-STEP kinda person.I like directions to be readily accessible just in case. Any direction you can give would be greatly appreciated. From start of project to finish. Thanks a million.
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Friday, September 10th, 2010 AT 2:59 AM

3 Replies

Tiny
RASMATAZ
  • MEMBER
Hi jbzip64j, Welcome to 2carpros and TY for the donation

If you can -can you give a pic where this leak coming from underneath, its a strange problem-when you open something it leaks, I need to know the location
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Sunday, September 12th, 2010 AT 8:39 PM
Tiny
JBZIP64J
  • MEMBER
I do not have any pics of the leak. There is no doubt that it is coming from the pumps primary weep hole.I would like to know, in your opinion, is there any special tips you can give before I dive in this project? For example, any tips on how to be 100% sure the timing chain goes back on right.I know that it is crucial that the cams are not spun while the timing chain is off. Any tips on the best way to align the timing marks? Things of that matter. I been told that this particular water pump can be a challeging project. Thank again.
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Sunday, September 12th, 2010 AT 11:13 PM
Tiny
RASMATAZ
  • MEMBER
Service and Repair

WATER PUMP

REMOVAL- 2.7L


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NOTE: It is normal for the water pump to weep a small amount of coolant from the primary weep hole (black stain at weep passage). Do not replace the water pump if this condition exists. Replace the water pump if a heavy deposit or a steady flow of engine coolant is evident from the primary weep passage (Fig. 39) and (Fig. 40). This indicates a shaft seal failure and pump must be replaced. Coolant may leak from the secondary weep passage and fill the valley of the engine (Fig. 39) and (Fig. 41). If this condition is found, clean the primary weep passage of debris. Be sure to perform a thorough analysis before replacing water pump.

WARNING: DO NOT REMOVE PRESSURE CAP WITH THE SYSTEM HOT AND PRESSURIZED. SERIOUS BURNS FROM COOLANT CAN RESULT.

Disconnect negative battery cable.
Drain cooling system.
NOTE: The water pump is driven by the primary timing chain.

Remove the timing chain cover, timing chain, and all chain guides.


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Remove bolts attaching water pump to block (Fig. 38).
Remove water pump and gasket.
CLEANING
Clean gasket mating surfaces as necessary.

INSPECTION - 2.7L
Inspect and replace the water pump if it has any of the following defects:

Damage or cracks on the pump body.
Coolant leaks: If the shaft seal is leaking, this will be evident by traces of thick deposits of dried glycol running down from the pump primary weep passage (Fig. 39) and (Fig. 40). A thin black stain below the pump primary weep hole/passage is considered normal operation.
Coolant leaks: If the pump primary weep passage is plugged, coolant may come from the secondary weep passage and collect in the valley of the engine. The coolant will eventually run out the back side of the engine (Fig. 39) and (Fig. 41). Leakage from the secondary weep passage may give false indications that core plug(s) may be leaking on the back side of the engine block. If this condition is found, clean the primary weep passage of debris.
Impeller rubs inside of cylinder block.
Excessively loose or rough turning bearing.
NOTE: It is normal for the water pump to weep a small amount of coolant from the primary weep hole (black stain at weep passage). Do not replace the water pump if this condition exists. Replace the water pump if a heavy deposit or a steady flow of engine coolant is evident from the primary weep passage (Fig. 39) and (Fig. 40). This indicates a shaft seal failure and pump must be replaced. Coolant may leak from the secondary weep passage and fill the valley of the engine (Fig. 39) and (Fig. 41). If this condition is found, clean the primary weep passage of debris. Be sure to perform a thorough analysis before replacing water pump.

INSTALLATION - 2.7L

Clean all sealing surfaces.
Install water pump and gasket. Tighten mounting bolts to 12 Nm (105 inch lbs.).
Install timing chain guides, timing chain, and timing chain cover.
Reconnect negative battery cable.
Fill cooling system.
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Sunday, September 12th, 2010 AT 11:40 PM

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