1998 CHEVY CAVALIER PCV VALVE

  • Tiny
  • jgmcgondel
  • 1998 Chevrolet Cavalier

Engine Mechanical problem
1998 Chevy Cavalier 4 cyl Front Wheel Drive Automatic 145000 miles

Where is the pcv valve located and what does it take to change it out?

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Monday, April 12th, 2010 AT 12:29 PM

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  • Tiny
  • factoryjack
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There are two 4 cylinders available in the 98 Cavalier, a 2.2L and a 2.4L. Neither of which have a PCV valve, or require positive crankcase ventilation system maintenance. Since I don't know the exact engine size, and the descriptions of operation differ slightly, I will paste both versions. The first is for 2.2L engines;
Crankcase Ventilation System Description
General Description
A crankcase ventilation system is used to provide scavenging of the crankcase vapors. Blow-by gases are passed through a crankcase ventilation oil/air separator into the air cleaner outlet resonator. The oil/air separator is inside the valve rocker arm cover and allows any scavenged oil to be returned to the crankcase.

Operation
The only flow through the oil/air separator is the combustion blow-by, as there is no fresh air inlet to the crankcase. The primary flow of blow-by into the separator is through the openings inside the valve rocker arm cover. The oil/air separator causes oil, which may be suspended in the blow-by gases, to be separated and drain back to the crankcase. The blow-by gases are then drawn into the air cleaner outlet resonator by normal engine vacuum and burned in the combustion process.

And 2.4L;
1998 Chevrolet Cavalier | Cavalier, Sunfire (VIN J) Service Manual | Engine | Document ID: 192483

Crankcase Ventilation System Description
General Description
A crankcase ventilation system is used to provide scavenging of the crankcase vapors. Blow-by gases are passed through a crankcase ventilation oil/air separator into the air cleaner outlet resonator. The oil/air separator is mounted to the engine block and allows any scavenged oil to be returned to the crankcase.

Operation
The only flow through the oil/air separator is the combustion blow-by, as there is no fresh air inlet to the crankcase. The primary flow of blow-by into the separator is through a hose from the timing chain housing. The oil/air separator causes oil, which may be suspended in the blow-by gases, to be separated and drain back to the crankcase. The blow-by gases are then drawn into the air cleaner outlet resonator by normal engine vacuum and burned in the combustion process.

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Monday, April 12th, 2010 AT 10:28 PM

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