Car wont turn over and makes a clicking noise

Tiny
DTBAKER
  • MEMBER
  • 1999 LINCOLN CONTINENTAL
  • 4.6L
  • V8
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 215,000 MILES
1999 Lincoln continental.
would turn over for a sec and then it would stop and start clicking so I thought it could be the starter so I replaced it and it won't turn over now and all it does is click but then it will stop and act like its losing power then it would do nothing at all. Checked all my fuses and relays and everything turned out ok. Battery is also completely charged. Anybody know what's wrong?
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Wednesday, June 11th, 2014 AT 5:35 PM

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Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
If that's a rapid, constant, repeating clicking, that's due to a weak battery or bad cables or connections. If the battery was charged at a slow rate for an hour, measure its voltage. You should find 12.6 volts. If it's around 11 volts, it has a bad cell and must be replaced.

Next, measure the voltage right on the battery posts while a helper tries to crank the engine. If the voltage drops a lot, the battery is bad or discharged. If the voltage stays up, move the voltmeter probes to the cable clamps and measure the voltage again during cranking. If it's lower than on the posts, one of those connections is loose or dirty.
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Wednesday, June 11th, 2014 AT 6:11 PM
Tiny
DTBAKER
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What if it's neither of them?
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Wednesday, June 11th, 2014 AT 9:56 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
You really need to give me some details or information to work with so I don't have to make guesses or ask you to do stuff you've already done. What were the results of those voltage measurements? What is the battery voltage?

Turn on the head lights, then see what happens to their brightness when you turn on the heater fan. If the head lights dim when the fan is turned on, that is proof there's a bad connection somewhere and it may be possible to find it with voltage readings. Leave those things turned on, then start right on the battery's posts, (not the cable clamps attached to them). You should have 12.6 volts or real close to it. If you do, move the meter probes to those cable clamps. The voltage must be exactly the same. If it's lower, one of those connections is loose or dirty.

Move the meter probes down the line that way. The goal is to find the next mechanical connection to take a reading. For the negative side that will be the engine block. Put the meter probe on a paint and rust-free surface on it. For the positive side that typically goes to the starter relay on the inner fender near the battery. On that one you want to put the meter probe on the copper stud, not the cable terminal bolted to it.

Most of the time you'll find the bad connection by this time or you'll find low battery voltage due to a bad battery.
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Thursday, June 12th, 2014 AT 9:03 PM

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