Car shut off and will not start

Tiny
LD4266
  • MEMBER
  • 2002 CHRYSLER CONCORDE
  • 3.5L
  • V6
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 174,000 MILES
I bought the car and the check engine light was on and the code was saying O2 sensor. The car ran perfectly fine and I took it to get the sensor changed and was told that the sensor will not come out without breaking so I did not change it. After about a day or two the car started acting funny, when I am driving and give it gas nothing happens and if I push the peddle to the floor it jerks and takes off and the check engine light starts to blink when it does that. After a week the car cut off in the middle of the street while I was driving. It is cranking but will not turn over to start. I changed the camshaft sensor and the crankshaft sensor and still will not start. Can some one please help?
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Friday, March 24th, 2017 AT 4:18 PM

7 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
First lets clear up the symptoms so we are talking about the same things. "Crank" and "turn over" are the same thing. They mean the starter is cranking the engine. You said it does and it does not. The biggest misconception is the diagnostic fault code. They never say to replace a part or that one is bad, so you should not be trying to replace the oxygen sensor yet. There are over a dozen fault codes related to oxygen sensors, and they mean very different things. Some of those codes are set when a properly-working sensor detects a problem, so replacing the sensor isn't going to solve anything. We need to know the exact fault code number so we can look up its meaning.

While an oxygen sensor could be defective, it is not going to cause a noticeable running problem. The symptoms you described have some other cause, and that is likely to be related to the flashing Check Engine light. The flashing light indicates the most serious of conditions is being detected and you're supposed to stop the engine right away. Forcing the engine to stay running is sending excessive un-burned fuel into the exhaust system where it will burn in the catalytic converter and overheat it. That can turn a minor problem into an expensive repair. Most commonly the excessive fuel in the exhaust is caused by spark-related misfires, typically from worn spark plugs or wires. For engines that use the coil-on-plug ignition coils, a failing coil can cause that too. To identify those, note the cylinder indicated in the misfire fault code, erase it, then switch that spark plug with one from a different cylinder. If the spark plug is the cause of the misfire, a new fault code will set for the cylinder the suspect plug was moved to.

Replacing sensors introduced new variables into the problem. That should only be done if there's a fault code that indicates that circuit needs further diagnosis. Often fault codes don't set for the cam or crank sensors just from cranking the engine. They set easier while a stalled engine is coasting to a stop. If you don't have a fault code related to them, but you suspect one has failed, it is more effective to observe them on the live data screen on a scanner. During cranking, they will be listed with a "No" or "Present" to specify if their signals are showing up to the Engine Computer.

When you don't have access to a scanner, you can tell if those signals are showing up by watching if the automatic shutdown, (ASD) relay is turning on. The Engine Computer turns that relay on when the engine is rotating, (cranking or running), and it knows that by those two sensor signals. Find the wire that is the same color at the ignition coil(s), every injector, or either small terminal on the back of the alternator. That is usually a dark green / orange wire. Back-probe that through the rubber seal, with a test light. Digital voltmeters don't respond fast enough. You should see the test light turn on for one second when you turn on the ignition switch. You might be able to hear the hum of the fuel pump at the same time. What is important is the light should turn on again during cranking. If it doesn't, those two sensors and their wiring are suspect. If it does, the sensors are working, and you have an ignition system OR fuel supply system problem, but not both. The sensor circuits account for about 95 percent of crank / no-start problems. You'll have no spark AND the fuel pump won't run during cranking. The fuel pump accounts for about another four percent, and one percent are caused by the ignition coil or coil pack.

There are special sockets made for removing oxygen sensors. If you're going to replace an O2 sensor, it doesn't matter if the old one is broken while removing it. On rare occasions one might be rusted tight enough that coupled with poor accessibility, it might be too tight to loosen. For that, visit the Chrysler dealer's parts department and ask for a spray can of their "Rust Penetrant". Squirt a little of that in the area of the threads, then wait about ten minutes. This stuff will do in ten minutes what WD-40 will do in a weekend. It was originally intended for rusted heat-riser valves on '60s through '80s engines.

Do you know how to read the diagnostic fault codes yourself?
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Friday, March 24th, 2017 AT 5:04 PM
Tiny
LD4266
  • MEMBER
I had a friend use their scanner and got the codes, then looked it up and it said misfire - O2 sensor 2/1. I then went to Autozone and they read the codes and it came back saying the same thing and gave me a print out showing me which one it was. I did not have any problems with the way it ran, all of a sudden it would not do anything when I was on the expressway and tried to give it gas, I took my foot off the peddle and pushed it to the floor and it jerked and started going. It would do it from time to time and then I was driving down the street and it just shut off and would not start back up. When you turn the key it turns but it does not start. I changed the camshaft sensor and the crankshaft sensor because someone looked at it and said it was one of those parts so I had them replaced and still doing the same thing.
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Friday, March 24th, 2017 AT 7:34 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
The running problem is not related to the fault code or the oxygen sensors, so do not get side-tracked down the wrong road. I need the exact fault code number. Your description is not anything I recognize, and I don't have any idea where to start with it.

Chrysler made reading diagnostic fault codes in the Engine Computer much easier than any other manufacturer. Cycle the ignition switch from "off" to "run" three times within five seconds, without cranking the engine. Leave it in "run", then watch the code number show up in the odometer display.
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Friday, March 24th, 2017 AT 7:40 PM
Tiny
LD4266
  • MEMBER
I am pretty sure this issue has nothing to do with the O2 issue. The battery totally died and now the codes are saying 000. I will go out and see if I can find the print out sheet right now. I will be right back.
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Friday, March 24th, 2017 AT 7:49 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
The diagnostic fault codes have been erased if the battery was disconnected to replace it. If what you were looking for only had the description you already posted, that won't help. I need the actual code number so I can look it up in our listing.

Go back to my original reply and do the quick test to see if the ASD relay is being turned on during cranking. That will tell us where to go next.
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Saturday, March 25th, 2017 AT 2:00 PM
Tiny
LD4266
  • MEMBER
OK I will do that, thank you.
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Sunday, March 26th, 2017 AT 4:59 PM
Tiny
KEN
  • ADMIN
Please let us know what you find so it will help others.

Best, Ken
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Wednesday, March 29th, 2017 AT 12:05 PM

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