2003 Buick Lesabre ABS / Tracking Light & rear calipers

Tiny
BLSTROUD
  • MEMBER
  • 2003 BUICK LESABRE
  • 6 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 42,000 MILES
Did a 4-wheel brake job on my 2003 lesabre. Replaced all pads, had front rotors turned at Goodyear, and did nothing with the rear rotors. I have 2 questions:

1. Why did the left rear piston retract using a basic C-clamp? That is, when we did the right rear after that, it wouldn't budge, and we figured out we needed the tool to twist it in. But why did the left one go in with little resistance, and without the tool? Is it o.K? Or is there a problem? The brakes seem to work fine, except for #2 below, but i'm wondering if only 3 wheels are working.

2. After the brake job, the ABS and the 'Tracking Off' lights remain on. Again, I had 2 rotors turned, and none were replaced. Did I knock something loose, maybe.

Thanks for your help!
Do you
have the same problem?
Yes
No
Tuesday, June 2nd, 2009 AT 2:36 PM

3 Replies

Tiny
ZACKMAN
  • MEMBER
1. You should be able to push the piston back in with a C-clamp. If you can't, then there is something wrong with the caliper. So, in your case, I would re-check the rear passenger side.

2. You may knock a sensor loose. There are many components for the ABS system, but I would check the wheel sensors (all 4 wheels).
Front


http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/55316_03lesabrefrontabs_1.jpg



Rear


http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/55316_03lesabrerearabs_1.jpg

Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, June 2nd, 2009 AT 11:25 PM
Tiny
BLSTROUD
  • MEMBER
Re. Number 1: Now i'm confused. All other sources (on-line reading, auto zone people, and my mechanic) said I had to have the twisting tool to retract, but they were baffled to hear that I got the left passenger piston in with a c-clamp.) I don't understand - since the rear-passenger piston was 'threaded' and required a tool to retract, it seems using a c-clamp would not be possible -- yet you say it's the correct tool.

Maybe you can tell me how the rear pistons are designed. Are they sliding pistons with a threaded 'head', so that some retraction could occur 'straight in' with a c-clamp, and the rest by twisting in the threaded piece? Or do I have the design all wrong in my head?
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Wednesday, June 3rd, 2009 AT 11:42 AM
Tiny
ZACKMAN
  • MEMBER
This is off Mitchell's website which receives its info from General Motors.


http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/55316_03lesabrerearbrake1_1.jpg



http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/55316_03lesabrerearbrake2_1.jpg



http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/55316_03lesabrerearbrake3_1.jpg



http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/55316_03lesabrerearbrake4_1.jpg



http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/55316_03lesabrefig2_1.jpg



http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/55316_03lesabrerearcaliper1_1.jpg



http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/55316_03lesabrerearcaliper2_1.jpg



http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/55316_03lesabrerearcaliper3_1.jpg



http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/55316_03lesabrerearcaliper4_1.jpg



http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/55316_03lesabrerearcaliper5_1.jpg



Your other sources are correct for the older model, but the later model are designed differently. If you go to Autozone.com and look at its repair guide, you will see the same thing that I am posting.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Wednesday, June 3rd, 2009 AT 11:13 PM

Please login or register to post a reply.

Recommended Guides