Replaced my shoes and my drums on both back tires, now not stopping properly

Tiny
ROBERT VENABLE FRISCH
  • MEMBER
  • 2007 CHEVROLET COLORADO
  • 3.7L
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 138,000 MILES
I just replaced my shoes and my drums on both back tires. Then I replaced both front rotors and pads, and I replaced the front left caliper and caliper bracket. After doing all of this I I was low on brake fluid I put some brake fluid in to the max line. I got in and drove through my parking lot when I hit the brakes they stopped but I had to go all the way to the floor and they didn't stop very well. I forgot to mention lol I did brake the ABS cables on both hubs, one when removing the hib and the second broke reinstalling the hub. I did pump my brakes not sure it was the correct way but I was told to just get in and pump the brake till it's stiff. It got stiffer but not solid. Also I tried going forward and pressing down all the way and in reverse. Any ideas?
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Monday, September 16th, 2019 AT 6:02 PM

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Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Welcome to 2CarPros.

Did you bleed the system? If you replaced the calipers and didn't bleed the system, there will be air in it and the brakes will not work properly. Also, what is an ABS cable? You lost me on that one. Were the rear brake shoes properly adjusted after the install?

Let me know.

Joe
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Monday, September 16th, 2019 AT 7:05 PM
Tiny
ROBERT VENABLE FRISCH
  • MEMBER
How do you know they are properly adjusted? The were centered and I turned the adjuster until I could just fit the drum on a little. I broke my ABS wire that goes into the front hubs. No, I wasn't aware I had to bleed them, lol. I figured but I was told to just pump it.
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Monday, September 16th, 2019 AT 7:12 PM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Welcome back:

It sounds like what you did with the rear will be okay, but they need bleed. Here is a link that shows how to bleed and flush the brakes. You only need to worry about bleeding them:

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-to-bleed-or-flush-a-car-brake-system

Now, since you only replaced the left front brake caliper, if the master cylinder never went empty, you should only have to bleed that caliper. However, here are the directions for doing all the wheels. Again, if the MC never was empty, the only place that air could have entered was when you were working on the caliper, so focus on that. By the way, you will need a helper. The helper will pump the brakes aprox 5 times and then hold pressure on the brake pedal. Next, open the bleeder on the caliper. Air and fluid will come out. While it is coming out, the brake pedal will go to the floor. Tell the helper to not release the brake pedal until you tighten the bleeder. If it is released before you seal the bleeder shut, it will suck more air back into the system.

Here are the directions. If the MC did go empty, let me know. Also, I started at number 5 because the directions prior were for the MC.

_________________________________

5. Install a proper box-end wrench onto the RIGHT REAR wheel hydraulic circuit bleeder valve.
6. Install a transparent hose over the end of the bleeder valve.
7. Submerge the open end of the transparent hose into a transparent container partially filled with Delco Supreme 11(R), GM P/N 12377967 (Canadian P/N 992667), or equivalent DOT-3 brake fluid from a clean, sealed brake fluid container.
8. Have an assistant slowly depress the brake pedal fully and maintain steady pressure on the pedal.
9. Loosen the bleeder valve to purge air from the wheel hydraulic circuit.
10. Tighten the bleeder valve, then have the assistant slowly release the brake pedal.
11. Wait 15 seconds, then repeat steps 8-10 until all air is purged from the same wheel hydraulic circuit.
12. With the right rear wheel hydraulic circuit bleeder valve tightened securely, after all air has been purged from the right rear hydraulic circuit install a proper box-end wrench onto the LEFT REAR wheel hydraulic circuit bleeder valve.
13. Install a transparent hose over the end of the bleeder valve, then repeat steps 7-11.
14. With the left rear wheel hydraulic circuit bleeder valve tightened securely, after all air purged from the left rear hydraulic circuit, install a proper box-end wrench onto the RIGHT FRONT wheel hydraulic circuit bleeder valve.
15. Install a transparent hose over the end of the bleeder valve, then repeat steps 7-11.
16. With the right front wheel hydraulic circuit bleeder valve tightened securely, after all air has been purged from the right front hydraulic circuit, install a proper box-end wrench onto the LEFT FRONT wheel hydraulic circuit bleeder valve.
17. Install a transparent hose over the end of the bleeder valve, then repeat steps 7-11.
18. After completing the final wheel hydraulic circuit bleeding procedure, ensure that each of the 4 wheel hydraulic circuit bleeder valves are properly tightened.
19. Fill the brake master cylinder reservoir to the maximum-fill level with Delco Supreme 11(R), GM P/N 12377967 (Canadian P/N 992667), or equivalent DOT-3 brake fluid from a clean, sealed brake fluid container.
20. Slowly depress and release the brake pedal. Observe the feel of the brake pedal.
21. If the brake pedal feels spongy, repeat the bleeding procedure again.

__________________________________________

I hope this helps. Let me know if you have other questions. And also let me know if this fixes the problem.

Take care,
Joe
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Monday, September 16th, 2019 AT 7:51 PM

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