Acura Integra Electrical Nightmare

Tiny
MIKEYBDMAN
  • MEMBER
  • ALL OTHER MAKES ALL OTHER MODELS
I know the Hondas have problems with the EFI relay. This relay has been known to just not let the car fire at all. The relay is called the PGM-FI Main relay. I would start there and see if that relay is supplying fuel and ignition to the car.
I can cut and paste the check out for this relay, but I cant send photos on this forum.


Testing and Inspection
NOTE: This relay has a missing terminal. If you hold the relay looking at the pins, and have that missing terminal on the top row, it should be the second pin from the right. The numbering of the pins is Top left to right
1, 2, x, 3
4, 5, 6, 7
NOTE: If the car starts and continues to run, the Programmed Fuel Injection (PGM-FI) main relay is OK.

PGM-FI Main Relay Location

Remove the PGM-FI main relay.
PGM-FI Main Relay Schematic View

Attach the battery positive terminal to the No. 2 terminal and the battery negative terminal to the No. 1 terminal of the PGM-FI main relay. Then check for continuity between the No. 5 terminal and No. 4 terminal of the PGM-FI main relay.
If there is continuity, go on to step 3.
If there is no continuity, replace the PGM-FI main relay and retest.
Attach the battery positive terminal to the No. 5 terminal and the battery negative terminal to the No. 3 terminal of the PGM-FI main relay. Then check that there is continuity between the No. 7 terminal and No.6 terminal of the PGM-FI main relay.
If there is continuity, go on to step 4.
If there is no continuity, replace the PGM-FI main relay and retest.
Attach the battery positive terminal to the No. 6 terminal and the battery negative terminal to the No. I terminal of the PGM-FI main relay. Then check that there is continuity between the No. 5 terminal and No. 4 terminal of the PGM-FI main relay.
If there is continuity, the PGM-FI main relay is OK.
If there is no continuity, replace the PGM-FI main relay and retest.
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Tuesday, August 22nd, 2006 AT 3:11 PM

4 Replies

Tiny
MIKEYBDMAN
  • MEMBER
Your problem is two fold. Fisrt off, you dont know that the distributor was the problem. Therefore you dont know if you did something worng, or if the problem is something else. I am going to paste the installation and procedure for the GS-R 1797cc engine. If that is not your model, you will need to list which engine you have.
Coat a new O-ring with engine oil then install it.
Slip the distributor into position. NOTE: The lugs on the end of the distributor and its mating grooves in the camshaft end are both offset to eliminate the possibility of installing the distributor 180 out of time.
Install the hold-down bolts and tighten temporarily.
Connect the 2-P and 8-P connectors to the distributor.
Spark Plug Wire Arrangement

Connect the spark plug wires as shown.
DLC & SCS Connector Locations

Timing Mark Location

CAUTION : Do not short any of the pins on the 3 pin Data Link Connector together or to ground.

Install a shorting connector at the 2 pin Service Check Connector and set the timing with a timing light to 16 2 BTDC @ 750 50 rpm (red line on crank pulley). Remove the shorting connector from the Service Check Connector.
After adjusting, torque the hold-down bolts, then install the cap on the bolt. Torque: 24 Nm (17 ft lb)
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Monday, August 21st, 2006 AT 8:19 PM
Tiny
JINNESCO
  • MEMBER
Wow, thanks for the immediate response and also the lesson in auto mechanic 101. I didnt' think it was that much more work besides plug n play. My car is a 1994 Acura Integra RS, B18B I believe is the engine number. The mileage on the car is 125,000 miles. I hope the updated info can help you help me. Thanks.
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Monday, August 21st, 2006 AT 10:44 PM
Tiny
JINNESCO
  • MEMBER
Hey guys, I have a 1994 Acura Integra which just recently passed the 100,000 mark. I was driving on the highway one day, and like some unfrotunate Honda owners, the car just shut down. I have followed up with this and apparently is a known issue with Hondas. I was instructed by numerous mechanics and previous Honda owners, that because the way Honda position their distributors in reference to the engine, they break down much quicker than any other makes and models. My problem is that I have purchased a new distributor and have tried to replace it myself, but no luck. :( I've marked where the rotor was pointing last and match the new one to that exact position, along with the housing position (which isn't necessary I think, since it appears that the the distributor is notched so that it can fit in only one way. ) Nevertheless, I replaced it, checked all the wires and connections, and when I tried to start the car, it cranks nicely but no luck in getting the car started. I did, however, noticed the battery was dying and the only thing I have is a battery jumper pack, which did not help at all. The distributor is sitting in the position that offers the best potential to start, by the sound of the crank. Any suggestions?
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Tuesday, August 22nd, 2006 AT 12:46 AM
Tiny
MIKEYBDMAN
  • MEMBER
I know the Hondas have problems with the EFI relay. This relay has been known to just not let the car fire at all. The relay is called the PGM-FI Main relay. I would start there and see if that relay is supplying fuel and ignition to the car.
I can cut and paste the check out for this relay, but I cant send photos on this forum.

Testing and Inspection
NOTE: This relay has a missing terminal. If you hold the relay looking at the pins, and have that missing terminal on the top row, it should be the second pin from the right. The numbering of the pins is Top left to right
1, 2, x, 3
4, 5, 6, 7
NOTE: If the car starts and continues to run, the Programmed Fuel Injection (PGM-FI) main relay is OK.

PGM-FI Main Relay Location

Remove the PGM-FI main relay.
PGM-FI Main Relay Schematic View

Attach the battery positive terminal to the No. 2 terminal and the battery negative terminal to the No. 1 terminal of the PGM-FI main relay. Then check for continuity between the No. 5 terminal and No. 4 terminal of the PGM-FI main relay.
If there is continuity, go on to step 3.
If there is no continuity, replace the PGM-FI main relay and retest.
Attach the battery positive terminal to the No. 5 terminal and the battery negative terminal to the No. 3 terminal of the PGM-FI main relay. Then check that there is continuity between the No. 7 terminal and No.6 terminal of the PGM-FI main relay.
If there is continuity, go on to step 4.
If there is no continuity, replace the PGM-FI main relay and retest.
Attach the battery positive terminal to the No. 6 terminal and the battery negative terminal to the No. I terminal of the PGM-FI main relay. Then check that there is continuity between the No. 5 terminal and No. 4 terminal of the PGM-FI main relay.
If there is continuity, the PGM-FI main relay is OK.
If there is no continuity, replace the PGM-FI main relay and retest.
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Tuesday, August 22nd, 2006 AT 3:11 PM

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