Added oil got a check engine light

Tiny
SQUIDNEY
  • MEMBER
  • 2012 HYUNDAI SONATA
  • 2.4L
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 140,000 MILES
Today I was driving and kept hearing a knocking noise in the engine area. I also noticed around 2nd or 3rd gear it would sputter before going into the next gear. The oil light would flicker. I pulled off to see what was going on and there was no oil in the engine. I went to a autozone, got the correct oil and then poured it into the engine. Next thing I know, the car runs a bit different. I mean it doesn't have pick up when pressing on gas as well as the check engine light coming on. Now I'm scared that I've done something to the engine. Did I mess up by putting new oil into an empty oil reservoir and driving right after? Help! I'm a lyft driver.
Do you
have the same problem?
Yes
No
Friday, January 25th, 2019 AT 6:44 PM

7 Replies

Tiny
HARRY P
  • EXPERT
Hello and thanks for using 2CarPros! When the oil light comes on, the car is basically telling you that it is dangerously low on oil. Adding the correct oil to an empty or even just low crankcase, even if it's hot, isn't going to hurt it. The correct thing to do when driving and the light comes on is to pull over and call someone (a ride, AAA, your insurance company's roadside assistance)or start walking to avoid doing any serious damage. Now, you may have gotten away with it though, because from what you're saying, the engine sounds fine now. It just has limited power.

Sometimes, when the computer detects a problem and turns on the check engine light, it may also go into a "limp" mode, which is a reduced power mode that still allows you to get where you're going, but is annoying enough that you'll go get it checked out.

So, what I think is that if the engine sounds ok at idle and still sounds ok with the engine being revved while sitting still, then you can take the car to the local AutoZone or other chain parts shop and get them to scan your car and give you the trouble code numbers.

Get those numbers (yes, the numbers, not just their translations) and post them on this thread and we'll look and see what's what. You might also get a mechanic or mechanically inclined friend to listen to it and see how they think the engine sounds.

Harry
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Friday, January 25th, 2019 AT 8:46 PM
Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
In addition to Harrys recommendation, making a video of the car running and posting it on this site may also help.
However if you did run it that low on oil the code you get may be for an issue with the camshaft or valve train. Most newer vehicles use some form of variable valve timing and many of those use oil pressure in various parts of that system. It is possible that the new oil moved a piece of dirt or sludge into a place that blocked or lowered the oil flow enough that it caused a timing change.
Getting the codes is a good first step. One question, when was the oil last changed? Trying to see if you have an oil use problem as well.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Friday, January 25th, 2019 AT 9:34 PM
Tiny
HARRY P
  • EXPERT
Yeah that's true about the variable timing and the potential oil use. Being that you're a Lyft driver and use your car as much as you do, I would suggest checking the oil whenever you fill the tank. That way, if you do need oil, you're already at a place where you can buy some and add it in a minute. Also, it's not a bad idea to have some oil, antifreeze, transmission fluid, a funnel, and a pair of jumper cables in the trunk.

I keep all of that in my mail route truck, along with a set of mechanics tools, spare brake pads, and a few other maintenance parts that I can change on the side of the road. I also pay a few bucks extra for roadside assistance coverage from USAA.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Saturday, January 26th, 2019 AT 4:51 PM
Tiny
SQUIDNEY
  • MEMBER
Well my car has got to the point where it isn't shifting right at all. The knocking continued. I even took it to an NTB and the lady refused to service my vehicle due to "liability" last night. I was furious and now I'm not sure what to do. Today I have to call around to see if other place are going to say the same thing.
The videos are different times the one of the dash shows my miles to empty changing. The second let's you hear the knocking while I'm driving. Upon accelerating it is sluggish and the knocking got louder. Again, now since last night anyway, the car is super hesitant and is pretty much not safe to drive on highways.
Oil doesn't seem like it did anything good for me by adding it for all this to have happened.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Sunday, January 27th, 2019 AT 5:21 AM
Tiny
SQUIDNEY
  • MEMBER
P0014
C1513
P0504
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Sunday, January 27th, 2019 AT 5:26 AM
Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
P0014 - Camshaft Position B - Timing Over-Advanced (Bank 1)
Sort of expected this one. It means that the cam positioner has stuck fully advanced. As such the engine is running in limp mode with low power. The knocking could be caused by this if the valves are staying open far enough that they are hitting the pistons. More than likely the timing set will need to be replaced and the engine checked to see if there is valve damage. If there is and it didn't do any other damage then a replacement cylinder head and the timing set along with it's related parts would likely repair it. However with 140K on it you might be better off replacing the engine with a lower mileage unit. It might be cheaper in the long run.

Both of these are related to the brake light switch being faulty. Seems they still haven't got ones that work right as these have been subjects of numerous recalls over the years.
C1513 - Brake switch error
P0504 - Brake Switch A/B Correlation
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
-1
Sunday, January 27th, 2019 AT 10:25 AM
Tiny
HARRY P
  • EXPERT
Yeahhhh that's definitely not a good sound. And I'm not too surprised about NTB not wanting to touch it. They generally don't want to touch cars that are making knocking noises because they don't want to be blamed for an engine kicking the proverbial bucket shortly after leaving their store. Hence the "liability" avoidance.

A while back my wife had someone change the oil on her car as we were getting ready to go out of town. They must've tightened the oil plug using a air wrench, because I could not get the thing off the next time it was due, even with a pair of vice grips. I tried several places and no one would touch it, except the guy at the used tire shop. He got it off applying heat and carefully hammering a smaller socket onto it, thereby sacrificing the socket. It worked and I didn't have to replace the pan.

And God knows, what's with the brake light switches and recalls on them? How hard can it be to make a simple and reliable electrical switch? Probably a result of over engineering, common in today's auto world.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Monday, January 28th, 2019 AT 4:15 AM

Please login or register to post a reply.

Sponsored links