2009 Honda CRV Battery Drain

Tiny
SLEDBOY2K
  • MEMBER
  • 2009 HONDA CRV
  • 2.4L
  • 4 CYL
  • AWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 60,000 MILES
My wife went to start the car last tuesday and it wouldn't start, she jumped it, got it started and about 30 seconds later she heard what she described as a hiss like letting air out of a tire. I was out of town so I told her to turn it off and take the truck. She says there was a chemical smell. I got home 2 days later, the battery was old so I figured I would get a new one before winter anyway. Installed new batter and fired it up. Ran perfect. She used it the next day to go to work and by the time she got off, nothing. BAttery dead. I jump started it again and drove it home (15 miles). Ran perfect. Drove with headlights on, battery charging at 14.4volts. I have been trouble shooting the electrical and this is what I have found. Approximately 7-8k ohms resistance through battery cables (taken off the battery of course). My amp meter pegs out at 20m and 200m but reads 0 at 10a so I think I have a pretty good parasitic draw but can't be totally sure. I have heard the a/c relay can stick, can you test a relay with an ohm meter to see if its bad? Any opinions on what might be going on or anything else I can check myself. Thanks
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Sunday, July 5th, 2015 AT 3:10 PM

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Tiny
KEN
  • ADMIN
Hi Sledboy2k,

When a battery goes bad, it can cause the starter motor to overload which could cause the problem you are describing. The battery cable resistance is normal, and also the draw which is initial when the electrical system is first connected an diminishes after power is restored. It is common for starter motors to go bad, we have replaced many in the shop for this exact reason.

Please let me know what you find,

Best, Ken
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Sunday, July 5th, 2015 AT 9:59 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
There's a problem with the current drain test you're doing. Most cars since the mid '90s have multiple computers that have to time out and go to "sleep" mode after the ignition switch is turned off. That can take up to 20 minutes. During that time there can be up to three amps of current flow.

The next problem is you won't get nearly enough accuracy on the 10-amp scale on your meter. You need the 200 milliamps scale. If you start out on that scale, the normal current for the computers that are still running will blow the meter's internal fuse which is typically a half-amp fuse. That means you have to start out on the 10-amp scale, then move the meter's positive lead to the other jack at least 20 minutes later. Doing that creates an open circuit for a few seconds, and guess what. That wakes up the computers for another 20 minutes and they draw high current again.

Even if you have a meter that doesn't use a separate 10-amp current jack, simply changing to a lower and more accurate scale does the same thing. All digital meters use a "break-before-make" switch which means it breaks the connection to one scale, then, as it is turned a little further, it makes the connection to the next scale. That way no two different scales are ever selected at the same time, but it also means you have a momentary open circuit when changing scales, and that again wakes up some computers.

The solution is to use a pair of small jumper wires to connect the meter leads, one to the battery's negative post, and one to the car's negative cable, (or the body), have the meter on the 10-amp scale, then use a third clip lead to connect the battery post to the cable whenever you want to switch scales. The third clip lead will bypass the momentary open circuit and prevent the computers from waking up.

Once the computers have timed out, unless specified differently by the manufacturer, the industry standard is to allow no more than 35 milliamps, (.035 amps), of "ignition-off-draw" current. At that rate, Chrysler says a good, fully-charged battery will be able to crank an engine fast enough to start after sitting for three weeks.

14.4 charging volts is perfect. It needs to be between 13.75 and 14.75 volts. That's right at the battery posts. You said that's what you found while driving, so if you were simply looking at the dash gauge, those are never very accurate. Dash gauges are only good for you to recognize when something is not normal. You need measure at the battery with the engine running.

That is only the first part of testing the charging system. You need a professional load tester to test for maximum output current and "ripple" voltage. If the generator has one bad diode of the six, the ripple voltage will be very high, and the most current you'll be able to get under full load is exactly one third of the generator's rated maximum current. With a bad diode, the output voltage can still be okay.

My concern is what sizzled and smelled. That is typical of a burning fuse link wire but most cars no longer use those. They are standard plug-in fuses instead, and bolted-in fuses for the generator's output circuit. There has to be something that isn't working unless a diode failed inside a computer module. Most computers have diodes placed backward between the 12 volt feed terminal(s) and ground. They don't do anything unless the battery is connected backward, then they become a dead short to force that circuit's fuse to blow, thereby protecting the computer. Sometimes those diodes just short, and you would expect the fuse to blow, but sometimes the short develops slowly enough that the copper traces on the circuit board burn open. At that point you might have the stink and the smell, but you won't have the reverse-polarity protection. The computer could still work properly.

You're going to have to elaborate on the 7,000 ohms of resistance you found. That value doesn't belong anywhere in battery cables or the car's wiring.
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Sunday, July 5th, 2015 AT 10:02 PM
Tiny
JEFF HB
  • MEMBER
  • 1999 HONDA CRV
  • 4 CYL
  • AWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 70,000 MILES
Electrical problem
1999 Honda CRV 4 cyl All Wheel Drive Automatic 70,000 miles

The repair shop cannot find why battery is draining over night. Battery has been replaced. Also new one has been checked. Alternator is charging. All door light switches have been checked using the draw down method referenced on this site. Repair man baffled and gave up. Please suggest something.
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Tuesday, December 20th, 2016 AT 10:57 AM (Merged)
Tiny
RASMATAZ
  • MEMBER
Finding an electrical short can be a nightmare-Do below


http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/12900_parastic_draw_1_152.jpg

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Tuesday, December 20th, 2016 AT 10:57 AM (Merged)
Tiny
JEFF HB
  • MEMBER
Test was completed at repair shop no electrical draw and battery still going dead over night.
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Tuesday, December 20th, 2016 AT 10:57 AM (Merged)
Tiny
KHLOW2008
  • EXPERT
If there are no parasitic electrical drain, the battery would not go dead, unless it is bad. What I suspect is an intermittent problem and this are usually caused by fan motor realays which intermttently sticks resulting in the fans staying on after the ignition switch is turned off.
.
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Tuesday, December 20th, 2016 AT 10:57 AM (Merged)
Tiny
JEFF HB
  • MEMBER
Thanks for the info. I will recheck the battery & look into the relays or other intermittent stuff staying on.
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Tuesday, December 20th, 2016 AT 10:57 AM (Merged)
Tiny
KHLOW2008
  • EXPERT
Does the draining occur every nite or only intermittently?
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Tuesday, December 20th, 2016 AT 10:57 AM (Merged)
Tiny
JEFF HB
  • MEMBER
The battery goes dead every night.
Thanks
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Tuesday, December 20th, 2016 AT 10:57 AM (Merged)
Tiny
KHLOW2008
  • EXPERT
That should be easy to detect.

Get an ammeter and disconnect the negative battery terminal. Attach the ammeter between the terminal and battery negative post and you would be a ble to read if there are any parasitic drain.

To test if it is the battery that is bad, leave the terminal disconnected and check if you are able to start in the morning.
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Tuesday, December 20th, 2016 AT 10:57 AM (Merged)
Tiny
TANARENE
  • MEMBER
  • 1998 HONDA CRV
  • 3 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 160,000 MILES
My car would not start one cold morning a couple weeks ago. I replaced the battery with a new one thinking this would solve the problem. Unfortunately, the next morning the car was dead. I had it jumped and then went and had the new battery, the alternator, and the starter tested. All were fine. Something is draining my battery after it sits overnight in very cold weather. I make sure everything is turned off and can not figure out what is wrong. How do I find the problem fuse or drain to the battery. I also made sure that the we battery was connected right and added battery shims to make sure it was tight.
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Tuesday, December 20th, 2016 AT 10:57 AM (Merged)
Tiny
KNOWLEDGE IS POWER
  • EXPERT
You have whats called a parasitic draw. To test this you need to have a meter set to amps and then connected inline between the ground cable and ground post on the battery. You shouldn't have more than 2 or 3 amps of draw with everything off. Remember to close the doors and make sure the dome lights are all off. Then pull one fuse at time and watch the amps on the meter. Put the fuse youve pulled back in before pulling another so they don't get confused if there was no amp change. If there is an amp change you can find what the fuse circuit is and start to figure out fro there why the power is being drained. If a new battery drained dead overnight then it should be easily apparent.
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Tuesday, December 20th, 2016 AT 10:57 AM (Merged)
Tiny
MADDIEFOX96
  • MEMBER
  • 2009 HONDA CRV
  • AWD
  • AUTOMATIC
My friends drained my battery (first time this ever happened) and I got it jumped off but I am worried it may have messed up the battery or something. Should I take it to be looked at or will it be okay?
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Tuesday, December 20th, 2016 AT 10:58 AM (Merged)
Tiny
CJ MEDEVAC
  • EXPERT
IT'S PROBABLY NO BIG THING

IT WON'T HURT TO VISIT A NATIONAL CHAIN AUTO PARTS STORE FOR A BATTERY/ CHARGING SYSTEM CHECK-UP - THIS IS USUALLY A FREE SERVICE!

NOT KNOWING THE HISTORY OF YOUR BATTERY OR HOW LONG YOUR PALS WERE DRAINING IT. YOU WILL NOT KNOW THE CONDITION OF IT "NOW" UNLESS YOU GET IT THOROUGHLY TESTED AT AN AUTO PARTS STORE.

THIS MIGHT AID YOU IN SOME WAY BEFORE YOU JUST JUMP IN ON ANY SPUR OF THE MOMENT PURCHASE. SEE THIS LINK

http://www.2carpros.com/questions/2001-dodge-neon-milage-just-want-put-fliuds-their-locations

RETURN TO THIS THREAD BEARING GOOD NEWS!

THE MEDIC
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Tuesday, December 20th, 2016 AT 10:58 AM (Merged)
Tiny
MADDIEFOX96
  • MEMBER
Thanks I will look into the Battery check up system!
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Tuesday, December 20th, 2016 AT 10:58 AM (Merged)
Tiny
CJ MEDEVAC
  • EXPERT
YOU ARE VERY WELCOME

GOOD LUCK!

GET YOU A '46 WILLYS JEEP LIKE MINE

AS YOU CAN SEE IN MY PIC, MY DAUGHTER, AT THE AGE OF 10, WAS ABLE TO FLUENTLY DRIVE "WILLY" (HIS NAME) AND HAND CRANK HIM UP (SHOULD THE BATTERY OR STARTER NOT BE WORKING) MOST OF THE TIME SHE WOULD HAND CRANK, JUST TO SHOW OFF!

PLEASE RETURN WITH GOOD NEWS!

THE MEDIC
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Tuesday, December 20th, 2016 AT 10:58 AM (Merged)

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