Rough Idle

Tiny
BREEZER4
  • MEMBER
  • 2006 DODGE STRATUS
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 112,000 MILES
I have a 2006 Dodge Stratus, 4cyl which has always had a rough idle but has worsened over time. Steering wheel vibrating quite noticeably at a stop light while in forward gear. Minimal in reverse, park or neutral and nearly nothing if revved up to 1200 rpm in neutral. Not noticeable while driving down the roadways at all.

Oil/filter change(s), timing belt change, tune up, and leaking exhaust resonator all done within the past 12k. Normal rpm is set at about 700-800 rpm.
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Thursday, February 10th, 2011 AT 12:36 AM

5 Replies

Tiny
ERNEST CLARK
  • EXPERT
Sounds like a low speed misfire. Do you have a check engine light on? If so, have computer scanned before proceeding.

If not, check for vacuum leaks, a leaking fuel pressure regulator and good spray pattern at injectors. (I'm advising you to begin at this stage of diagnosis only because you said you already had a tune up)
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Thursday, February 10th, 2011 AT 12:51 AM
Tiny
BREEZER4
  • MEMBER
Thanks for the immediate reply!
Engine light does not come on, gas mileage continues to be at 25-26, and idle is rough hot or cold. Forgot to put those tidbits in originally.
Will have vacuum and fuel pressure regulator checked asap. Flying out of town for a few days first.
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Thursday, February 10th, 2011 AT 1:05 AM
Tiny
ERNEST CLARK
  • EXPERT
Let me know which codes you pull after computer scan
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Thursday, February 10th, 2011 AT 12:11 PM
Tiny
BREEZER4
  • MEMBER
Will advise you after scan. When I mentioned the gas mileage I was indicating that it remains satisfactory for that engine.
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Thursday, February 10th, 2011 AT 2:17 PM
Tiny
ERNEST CLARK
  • EXPERT
Keep in mind all scanners or the people who use them aren't created equal. I know the purpose of this forum is to help people save money by working on their own cars. But sometimes chasing down problems becomes expensive both in time and money.

After many days/weeks of unsuccessful diagnosis and the spending of hard earned cash, sometimes people wish they'd have just spent the money with a knowledgeable technician.

A tech with a professional scanner doesn't need a check engine light to flash or codes to be present to diagnose an engine problem. He'll be able to see the live data from the sensors being fed to the engine and interpret the data to isolate an issue. However, a good tech is expensive.

Also, some problems won't show up on a scanner, such as most of the fuel system. If there's a clogged filter or pump, the lines are kinked, the fuel pressure regulator is leaking, etc, none of this will show up because the computer can't see it.

I'm telling you this in case you get to a point were you've spent too much time and money looking for a problem. I'll try to continue helping you as much as I can.
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Friday, February 11th, 2011 AT 1:17 AM

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