2005 Toyota Sienna Noise

Tiny
ROMEROELVIA
  • MEMBER
  • 2005 TOYOTA SIENNA
  • 135,000 MILES
While driving I hear a noise my husband lifted van and while wheels are spinning they don't seem to spin smoothly/normal and then all of sudden the slip Indicator light turns on. Could you please help.
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Sunday, October 6th, 2013 AT 12:11 PM

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Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
If you're running the vehicle in gear with it raised off the floor, and it has traction control / anti-lock brakes, all four wheels have to be rotating at the same speed, otherwise the traction control will kick in to slow the wheel it thinks is going too fast. There should also be a switch on the dash to turn the traction control off.
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Sunday, October 6th, 2013 AT 12:26 PM
Tiny
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Thank you, for responding. What do you think the noise is? My husband changed the breaks, went ahead and put new tires and also aligned the van. I drive the van and could see that the noise is coming from the front. My daughter even drove the van and thought she had a flat tire. Could you please help?
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Sunday, October 6th, 2013 AT 9:22 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
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You have to describe the noise. Is it a scraping, rubbing, or grinding-type of noise? Does it occur all the time the engine is running, just when the van is moving, just when turning the steering wheel, etc?

If it sounds like the buzz of an airplane engine only when the van is moving, that is typical of a noisy front wheel bearing. I can offer a number of ways to confirm that.

If it's a scraping noise that only started after the brake work, the common suspect is a bent metal splash shield. The fix is just to pull it away from the brake rotor.
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Sunday, October 6th, 2013 AT 9:50 PM
Tiny
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  • MEMBER
I think it is a buzzing noise because it's only when the van is moving. We'll have to look at the bearings. How do you check those? Is that hard?
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Sunday, October 6th, 2013 AT 10:12 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
My preferred method of checking wheel bearings is to run the car in gear on a hoist and listen next to each one with a stethoscope. You won't hear the noise that way without one because there's no weight on the bearings.

After being a suspension and alignment specialist for over 25 years, I learned another way just a couple of years ago. That is to raise the tire off the ground, reach over the top of it and wrap your fingertips around the coil spring, then spin the tire by hand. If the bearing is noisy, you'll feel the roughness in the spring.

The most involved way is to borrow a "Chassis Ear" from an auto parts store that rents or borrows tools. It is a set of six microphones, a switch box, and headphones. You clip the microphones to suspect points, then drive around while listening with the headphones. You can move the microphones around to zero in on the source of the noise. Be aware that many mechanics have never seen or even heard of this tool. Suspension and alignment mechanics use it to find rattles, squeaks, and other noises.
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Monday, October 7th, 2013 AT 12:26 AM
Tiny
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Thanks for all your help.
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Monday, October 7th, 2013 AT 5:23 PM

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